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What's your education level?

Thread starter #1
Just wondering what people on a site like this have as their education....Are most people here not degreed but have figured things out on their own?

Or are u degreed in Electrical Engineering? do u have a B.S, M.S., or even a PhD?

perhaps u went to ITT Tech or similar school and have an electronics associates degree?

are u a technician?

are u degreed in something else besides EE?

myself, I have a B.S. in EE
 

tvtech

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Most Helpful Member
#2
Just wondering what people on a site like this have as their education....Are most people here not degreed but have figured things out on their own?

Or are u degreed in Electrical Engineering? do u have a B.S, M.S., or even a PhD?

perhaps u went to ITT Tech or similar school and have an electronics associates degree?

are u a technician?

are u degreed in something else besides EE?

myself, I have a B.S. in EE
Hi lebevti

I have had electronics in my blood since around the age of 10 years old. I remember breaking things just to find out what was "in the box'. Drove my parents crazy in those early years :eek:

Progressed to actually understanding what was in the box in my early teens. Magazines like Practical Electronics, Elektor, ETI and other publications
helped me no end. And gave me a hunger to learn more. And actually design and etch PCB's with good old Ferric Chloride :)

Some failures, but mostly successes. Amazing to work with and understand how to etch PCB's. With consistent results.

There is something so satisfying in designing a PCB from start to finish that works.

Then TWENTY years of being a TV Tech with CRT.

Thing is....you have to have a PASSION for Electronics. Otherwise...you are wasting your time ;)

To answer your question lebevti......no degrees etc.....Absolulely nothing except joy at helping those that are prepared to listen....:)

And loads of experience...I am never wrong....:)

So, I mostly sit back and watch. Great Forum. Great members.

Cheers,
TV Tech
 
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Ian Rogers

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#3
And loads of experience...I am never wrong....
tvtech!!! Very brave.... Especially with some of the folks on here.

I have said qualifications, however! that said, tvtech is right you really need the passion and drive... It helps if you know what your doing.

I have also said that I know plenty of EE guy's with masters or bachelors that know diddly squat...:D
 
#4
I'm not sure what it says about qualifications, or passion, or posts as others would define them but I never graduated High School; I obtained my GED (in the US it's testing that certifies you've obtained the equivalent of a high school education) quiet a ways back just to have the piece of paper that I find useless in defining what I'm capable of.

Any of my learning outside of that is all self taught or learned sometimes from the members here and more broadly from the Internet in general, as well as a handful of close friends.

Education is not so important when you consider what you are not just able to think of, but have actually done. In this respect I am a child still.
 
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#5
Hi lebevti, nice idea for a thread. I nearly completed my Associate Diploma. I got about 3/4 of the way through before my funding (and perhaps motivation) dried up. I worked for 10 years as a tech working on basic digitally controlled power supplies. My work paid for the first 3/4 of my uni degree before they went broke and I was retrenched. I have been interested in electronics ever since my parents bought me my first Dick Smiths Funway Into Electronics kit when I was about 7. As others have said, I think an interest is more important than knowledge (unless working around high voltages lol).


I have also said that I know plenty of EE guy's with masters or bachelors that know diddly squat...:D
LOL so true. I remember arguing with my head engineer because he could remember the difference between MOSFETS and Transistors ("I know one of them is current controlled and one is voltage controlled but I don't know which one" lol).
 
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#6
I remember taking old thrown out computers a munching parts together to make it startup when i was 8 or so.... other than that I dont know much :p
 
#7
Knowing a person by degree or formal education isn't a good way to judge a person. There's something different to judge a person with, it's experience. If you wanted to know how good the person is in the field, then ask for his experience.

As far as thread is concerned, i'm still a student.

Edit:
I have also said that I know plenty of EE guy's with masters or bachelors that know diddly squat...
Exactly, almost cent percent. I've seen only hand-countable number of people who are knowledgeable with a masters/bachelors degree. I sometimes wonder how they got the degree.
 
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DerStrom8

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#8
Knowing a person by degree or formal education isn't a good way to judge a person. There's something different to judge a person with, it's experience. If you wanted to know how good the person is in the field, then ask for his experience.
The problem with that is that some people are experienced idiots :D
 

tvtech

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#9
The problem with that is that some people are experienced idiots :D
I work with one. He was incorrectly trained from the start and nothing or anybody on this planet will ever get him out of his bad habits. Heaven knows.....I have tried :rolleyes:

Cheers,
TV Tech
 

DerStrom8

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#11
So, how do you think we can judge a person?
The only way you can judge a person is to get to know them personally. Spend some time with them, watch them work, see how they do things. There is no way to judge them without really getting to know them. It's impossible.
 

tvtech

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#12
LOL... In one way, even this is true. Some people don't change even with experience. (Some don't even learn with experience). I've seen people of these kind too.

So, how do you think we can judge a person?
Electronics wise.....give them 4 1N4007 diodes and tell them to build a bridge rectifier....fail everytime. Because they don't know what what they are doing..

If the person gets it right...they have a clue. And then I will help further to the best of my ability.

The very basics. So important :)

Cheers,
TV TECH
 
#13
You can find out like this; Maybe you want to know how good they are ask them to do things that involve that knowledge of the subject, if they can do it good... If they cant then too bad. Like a drivers licence test...


*EDIT* Relized derstrom basically said the same thing as me I didnt notice a second page... Sorry.
 
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tvtech

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Most Helpful Member
#14
Electronics wise.....give them 4 1N4007 diodes and tell them to build a bridge rectifier....fail everytime. Because they don't know what what they are doing..

If the person gets it right...they have a clue. And then I will help further to the best of my ability.

The very basics. So important :)

Cheers,
TV TECH

FWIW.....That is why people like Nigel and others caution members and like people TO UNDERSTAND what they are doing before doing stuff :)

Never ending work.

TV Tech
 
#15
tvt: I disagree with: never ending work. It is never ending joy!

But to add my own $1/50: in the Wernherr von Siemens college I went to in the 60s, in Frankfurt, Germany, our teacher, a commie, would explain colour codes this way:
The negative wire of the battery is blue, the positive wire is red. Oh....! I just read this book on Red China....
I don't know much. And what I do know about it is less than worth remembering. E
 
#17
I have a HS Diploma but the quality of my education was pretty poor after 8th grade. I learned more at school in my spare time when I was in the library reading books...
This is an unfortunate problem in the states and is getting worse.
 

tcmtech

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#18
I like to draw on paper with crayons. :p
 

DerStrom8

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#19
I have a HS Diploma but the quality of my education was pretty poor after 8th grade. :( I learned more at school in my spare time when I was in the library reading books...
I didn't really learn anything about electronics in high school. All that I learned during that period was self-taught, and included a LOT of research in my spare time. I didn't know anyone in person who could help me learn. My family members were clueless when it came to electronics, as were my teachers and friends. I often found myself doing the research during my study periods (free times during the day), when I didn't have other work to do.
 
#20
I didn't really learn anything about electronics in high school.
I didn't either, but I was at least given basic programming knowledge using Logo, and solid typing skills via touch typing classes.

My even entering the electronics world stemmed from a curiosity of how the software did what it did. I'm glad for it as well I wouldn't have even known what a PC was or what programming was through traditional teaching.
 
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