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What protocol is this?

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Slowmo

New Member
Protocol is used by my wireless gate opener transmitter/decoder.

This is how I think bits are encoded:
Short high pulse indicates a start of a message.
"1" is a short low followed by long high
"0" is a long low followed by short high


I searched the web for possible protocols, but didn't find anything similar.
Full message is a 10 bit address (programmable by dip switches), followed by 2 bits indicating particular button (4 buttons possible). Below is an example on how bits are encoded (not the full message).

bits-png.36068
 

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Sceadwian

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Nigel Goodwin

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Most Helpful Member
No, it doesn't look like Manchester - that uses the change from negative to positive as a '1' and the change from positive to negative as a '0', check my tutorial at for details.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
You said it was how you think the bits are encoded.
Can you post the waveform of an entire frame and it's known data values? It's impossible to decode otherwise.
 

BrownOut

Banned
Agree that it's not Manchester coding. My first thought was that it's some propriatary coding.
 

Slowmo

New Member
I think there is no need to post the full frame, because it will look the same as in my first example. Just couple more bits on the right side.
So it must be a proprietary coding then. It's by 1/3 less effective than Manchester coding, but using this coding it is very easy to clock data, because each transition from high to low represents an end of a bit (except for the start pulse). I was thinking that maybe it is some encoding standard which I don't know.
 
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