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What mAh value does a standard 9V battery have?

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Lac

New Member
I have got a white/blue LED that draws 100mA, how long would a plain, normal, standard 9V battery be able to supply enough current for the LED to light up brightly?

And btw, what is the voltage drop over a normal led? Is the drop the same for the type of LED I've got hold of here?

Cheers!
Lac.
 

Optikon

New Member
Lac said:
I have got a white/blue LED that draws 100mA, how long would a plain, normal, standard 9V battery be able to supply enough current for the LED to light up brightly?

And btw, what is the voltage drop over a normal led? Is the drop the same for the type of LED I've got hold of here?

Cheers!
Lac.

with regards to battery capacity, you did not specify what type of chemistry your 9V battery is, and it matters.

Since you said plain and normal, I assume it is alkaline type.

Expect between 400 and 600 mAh. A good quality panasonic industrial type shows 570 mAh.. low end type probably more like 400.

You should expect at least 4 hours out of your brightly lit LED.

Typical forward drops for normal LED (for which a 100mA device is not normal) I am talking a T1 type or SMT type that runs up to around 20mA.

Green is about 1.9V
Blue (maybe white also - not sure) more like 2.5 - 3.5V
Reds, ambers and similar are less than 1.9V I believe

These are very rough numbers so consult the datasheet to be sure..
 

olly_k

Member
Blue (maybe white also - not sure) more like 2.5 - 3.5V
White LED's are infact blue LED's in disquise :shock: They just have a blue-sensitive phospher coating to produce the rest of the spectrum.
 

JFDuval

New Member
Hi!

If a 9V is approximatly 600mAh, can you tell me what for a AA? and for a AAA ? Also, is the difference big between a alkaline 9V and a carbon 9V ? Thanks in advance,
 

Crofty

New Member
AA's are 2700mAh. AAA's are 1175mAh (assuming Alkaline)

An alternative for your White LED's drive, try 3x1.2V Nicads/NiMh, this gives 3.6V. which is ideal for white leds ;) NiMh's are available upto 2300mAh.

Even more sneaky, use One Nicad with one IC. ie: MAX1678. This gives a fixed 3.3V o/p @45mA (one Cell) or, 3.3V @90mA (2 cells)

Steve
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
JFDuval said:
Hi!

If a 9V is approximatly 600mAh, can you tell me what for a AA? and for a AAA ? Also, is the difference big between a alkaline 9V and a carbon 9V ? Thanks in advance,

Zinc carbon batteries are really useless, have a look at these discharge graphs I plotted many years ago using two AA's and a 200mA bulb https://www.lpilsley.com/viewbatt.htm.

Notice that two Duracell AA's last about 8-9 hours at 200mA.
 

pike

Member
those "high power" batteries sicken me!!, it's these kinds of batteries that are falsely marked.

I wonder how the metal hydride types would match up???
 

spuffock

Member
And if you think you can get away with it because your project only draws 50ua, then the damned things leak and everything corrodes. :evil:
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
spuffock said:
And if you think you can get away with it because your project only draws 50ua, then the damned things leak and everything corrodes. :evil:

Yes, always use alkaline batteries! - normal ones just leak and destroy things. I've just had a Sony CD/Radio/Cassette brought into work, under warranty! - he's let the batteries leak everywhere, it's full of nasty corrosive liquid - totally destroyed!. As you can well imagine, this is 'customer misuse' and not covered by warranty!.
 
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