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What is this component?

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2PAC Mafia

Member
Hello,

I was thinking this component was a capacitor but when I measure with LCR it recognizes as a resistor with very low value as a short (it´s not damaged because I measure different ones with same behavieur). Anybody knows what is it?
 

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2PAC Mafia

Member
Thanks, it´s exactly the same looking. The strange thing is why LCR in automatic mode doesn´t recognize it as an inductor.
 

Ylli

Active Member
Sometimes those auto-sensing devices get cornfused. Put the meter in inductor mode and see what it reads.
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Cap's can look like that too
If you look closely at the image in the OP you'll see that they do not quite look like tantalum caps. I think an inductor would be the best bet.
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
Well I see that after saving it opening it up and zooming it. It's missing a line on one side tantalum caps have.
But i never seen a inductors with 272k there all like have a R in there or just 274 or 1R27l or 6R8 stuff like that, I'd check it as a cap too.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
By the look; it is non polar. That leaves out many parts. If you have many of these parts I would say break it and look inside.
(inside there is a piece of paper "inductor you fool". ;) )
 

Ylli

Active Member
Take it out of circuit. Then use that auto-sensing meter you have and put it in manual mode. Select inductance and measure it. Select capacitance and measure it. Select resistance and measure it. Which measurement makes the most sense? If in doubt, post the measurements here.
 

Colin

Active Member
Here's the way to test.
Notice, no-one in the forum has offered this advice before.

Get a known inductor of almost any value, but try to keep the value similar to the one being investigated.
Measure the inductance. Now put the two in series and you will get an increased value. The difference is the value of the unknown inductor.
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Here's the way to test.
Notice, no-one in the forum has offered this advice before.

Get a known inductor of almost any value, but try to keep the value similar to the one being investigated.
Measure the inductance. Now put the two in series and you will get an increased value. The difference is the value of the unknown inductor.
Nobody has "offered this advice before" because it remains unconfirmed whether or not the device is indeed even an inductor.
 

Colin

Active Member
Nobody has "offered this advice before" because it remains unconfirmed whether or not the device is indeed even an inductor.

That's the very thing you will determine if the inductance increases by "27,"
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Nobody has "offered this advice before" because it remains unconfirmed whether or not the device is indeed even an inductor.

That's the very thing you will determine if the inductance increases by "27,"
I think the smart move would first be to measure the inductance of just this one device. If it shows up as 2.7uH then the job is done.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If it shows up as 2.7uH then the job is done.
TRUE!
Some meters don't measure uH very well. You might try measuring uH with the probes shorted together. You might have 3.3uH or more with no part connected. Also, with a good meter, and the leads calibrated out, I might be happy with a reading of 2.0uH to 3.5uH.
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
TRUE!
Some meters don't measure uH very well. You might try measuring uH with the probes shorted together. You might have 3.3uH or more with no part connected. Also, with a good meter, and the leads calibrated out, I might be happy with a reading of 2.0uH to 3.5uH.
Good point, I've had this very issue.
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
Kind of funny know one pointed out how to test it.
I kind of figure the OP to smart enough to know that and how to do it .
 
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