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What is the fastest speed that a switch can operate?

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Sorry guys not a techy so please answer in non tech speak! Cheers!

Thinking about 3d imaging, how quickly could a switch be turned on and off?
 

Papabravo

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That's OK -- I'm not a mind reader. A mechanical switch should be able to make or break about 2 to 4 times per second. Why do you ask, and what does this have to do with 3D imaging?
 
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crashsite

Banned
Practice vs. Theory

Sorry guys not a techy so please answer in non tech speak! Cheers!

Thinking about 3d imaging, how quickly could a switch be turned on and off?
If you're thinking about grabbing a regular toggling light switch, such as you'd find on the living room wall, 2 to 4 times a second is probably a pretty good number. If you're thinking about how fast a mechanical switch can operate, the answer is probably in the neighborhood of 1000 times per second but, there are so many factors to consider that 1000 prople would give 1000 different rates. If it's an electronic switch, then 10s or even hundreds of billions of times per second are not unreasonable. If you get into atomic level switching, trillions of times per second can be considered.

If you are modelling some sort of animation that will show the switch action, you should probably stick with the 2 to 4 per second speed (or slower) sinve the eye and brain can't see/process the faster speeds.
 
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Sorry to take so long to reply have had other projects to deal with! As usual! No I was thinking about how two or more more invisible lasers could interact to create a point of visible light in any pint in space?
 
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Papabravo

Well-Known Member
In your opinion how would this work exactly? Sounds like a bit of fuzzy thinking, but I could be wrong.
 

crashsite

Banned
Sorry to take so long to reply have had other projects to deal with! As usual!
You know, one thing I've noticed during my years on this planet, is that people who are just so darn busy that they just never have time to do anything...also, never seem to get any more done than people who seem to have more time on their hands. In fact, usually less. It's not so much a lack of time as really poor time management.

No I was thinking about how two or more more invisible lasers could interact to create a point of visible light in any pint in space?
While this endeavor is pretty much non-sensible in a real-world environment, as a 3-D modeling project, it's pretty easy. You simply create your model, showing no laser beams (to indicate their invisibility) and where you envision they will meet, model a visible spot.

Even a guy that's as pressed for time as you seem to be should be able to find a few moments to place a single pixel in a field to denote your laser beam intersection.
 
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