Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

What is Chassis Ground, Technical Ground, Circuit Ground?

Status
Not open for further replies.

victor

New Member
Hi friends,
I'm new to audio electronics and very often I have seen written on some audio books the terms
"technical grownd", chassis ground, audio ground, circuit ground" etc.
What do them mean?

Victor
 

thec

New Member
Hi.

Often ground just means connecting to the battery's ground (0). That would be the circuit ground.

The audio ground would be the outer shield of an audio cable. In most audio cables, you just have 2 wires per channel (left & right mostly) and that should be it. Note that in many (most?) designs, audio ground is more or less connected to the circuits ground.

The "chassis ground" would be the box you're building your project into. For a computer, it would simply mean connecting the cable to the computer chassi.

Technical ground I dunno... if you try to look into the schematics description (could state something like "R2 is connected to the technical ground"), you could prob. check up R2 in the design and see where it is connected...

I don't have any idea if this helped you some, but I hope so.
//Albert "thec" Sandberg
 

kinjalgp

Active Member
Not that ground doesn't always mean that it is at zero potential. But that is a point in the circuit which we consider to be at zwro potential and measure all the circuit voltages with respect to this common reference point i.e. ground.


Kinjal
 

Dean Huster

Well-Known Member
When dealing especially with audio circuits, you may find that there are several grounds involved. There is earth ground which is where the mains plug connects. That usually ends up connected to the chassis. Chassis ground is generally where all the other grounds end up being connected. There are floating grounds which are common reference points, but which are never connected to the chassis. A good example of this would be the floating ground of the measurement portion of a bench (mains-powered) DMM. This has to be floating to allow you to connect the COMMON lead to anything you want.

Sometimes the "chassis" grounds are "somewhat floating" in audio equipment. For instance, the phono preamp circuit may have all of it's ground connections tied to one physical point. This point is then connected to chassis ground. Then another portion of the circuitry may have all its grounds tied to a different point and this point then connected to chassis ground. All this is done to reduce or eliminate ground loops which can otherwise inject considerable "hum" into the equipment.

I've seen printed circuits where a connection that was destined for a ground connection was taken as an isolated run right straight through a wide ground plane, finally connecting to that ground plane at a specific spot, all in the interest of eliminating a ground loop.

Dean
 

Hero999

Banned
Who's been banned?

I take it some idiot bumped this thread with a post that violated the forum rules and it's now been deleted and the idiot banned.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top