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What compiler to use?

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Kryten

New Member
Im looking for a easy to use free compiler that handles many code lines.

Im used to coding i C but anything will do.
 

tresca

Member
hm..this may or may not be an important question...

what is the compiler for ? pc ? uC ? if so, which one ?
 

tresca

Member
sometimes ppl post in wrong areas...

I'm not sure of any free compilers...I know that microchip has the student version (basically the full version w/o optimization)
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I suggest having a look at BoostC for the 16 and 18 series chips and C18 for the 18 series. Both are free but BoostC is limited to 2K program space which is really more than most people ever use.

edit, if 2k is too small, to purchase BoostC is around $80.

Mike.
 
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Kryten

New Member
I will look in to BoostC, and C18 since im currently working most with 18 series chips..

If there are other suggestion im open to ideas
 

Kryten

New Member
Yes but i think that my software will be quite big.
Im going to control two steppers both with buttons and automatic. Drive a LCD. Calculate the number of stops for the steppers. And have voltage reference for the two steppes
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Yes but i think that my software will be quite big.
Im going to control two steppers both with buttons and automatic. Drive a LCD. Calculate the number of stops for the steppers. And have voltage reference for the two steppes
I'm pretty sure that I could write that within the confines of the (free) BoostC compiler (2K) and the (also free) Swordfish basic compiler (18 series). However, if you go over the limits then they are both relatively cheap to purchase. C18 will be more than adequate if you go the 18 series route.

Mike.
 

blinky465

New Member
If you can face BASIC

I code in C too and thought that going back to BASIC would be a step backwards, but the PIC simulator IDE at oshonsoft.com is very good and only costs about £25. Complete simulator and compiler in one, includes serial/USART emulation. After playing with the 30-day trial, I stopped looking for freeware and opened my dusty wallet and have been really pleased.
 

tresca

Member
download "Applications Maestro"
http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/mpam100r.zip

and then download the modules to load into the maestro software
http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/mpammodulesv103.zip

Then when you run the program, it will ask you what modules do you want to load. Load up xlcd, and it will ask you a bunch of questions, and will generate a header file that correspond to the answers you put for the questions.

Some of the questions is like
what pin do you want for Enable?
8bit or 4bit mode ?
What port for data ?

Stuff like that.
 

Kryten

New Member
Does it matter what driver that is on the LCD? I mean like if its a KS0086 or something else?
 

Kryten

New Member
Ok I got the L2432 LCD panel (parts of some scrap @ work) it has the KS0063/KS0066 or equivalent driver and i dont know whether it will work or if i need to "make" my own driver/library for it. Or if it will work with the library for HD44780 driver
 
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