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using PIC's

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mstechca

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I have an LCD which I seldomly use, and a 64K EPROM which I also seldomly use. I want to be able to use a processor and get my other components to good use.

Nigel has produced a page on PIC's, but I still have some questions:

#1. What is input according to the chip? Data set "A" or data set "B"?
#2. Do I provide the chip processor codes? if so, where can I find the codes?
#3. Because there are different chips that start with PIC, (like 16F628, and 16F84) Is there a big difference if I choose a different number?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
mstechca said:
I have an LCD which I seldomly use, and a 64K EPROM which I also seldomly use. I want to be able to use a processor and get my other components to good use.

An EPROM isn't much use with a PIC, but the LCD should be useful.

Nigel has produced a page on PIC's, but I still have some questions:

#1. What is input according to the chip? Data set "A" or data set "B"?

Most I/O pins can be set as either, although there are a few exceptions, these are mentioned in the datasheet - the TRIS registers set the direction of the pins.

#2. Do I provide the chip processor codes? if so, where can I find the codes?

I don't really understand the question?, but the assembler instructions are listed in the datasheet, and also in the MPASM helpfile.

#3. Because there are different chips that start with PIC, (like 16F628, and 16F84) Is there a big difference if I choose a different number?

16F means it's a 14 bit core device, these will all be very similar, but there are minor hardware differences, and the software needs to take account of those.
 

mstechca

New Member
#2. Do I provide the chip processor codes? if so, where can I find the codes?


I don't really understand the question?, but the assembler instructions are listed in the datasheet, and also in the MPASM helpfile.

What data do I send to the chip? do I send codes the chip accepts, or could I send anything?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
mstechca said:
#2. Do I provide the chip processor codes? if so, where can I find the codes?


I don't really understand the question?, but the assembler instructions are listed in the datasheet, and also in the MPASM helpfile.

What data do I send to the chip? do I send codes the chip accepts, or could I send anything?

The chip is basically a computer, you send it a computer program!.

You can write the program in assembler, then assemble it with MPASM/MPLAB - this produces a .HEX file, which a programmer then transfers to the PIC. Or you can use various high level languages, BASIC, C, etc. these are then converted to assembler (compiled), then converted to a .HEX by an assembler as before (often this is a single step process, as far as the user is concerned).
 
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