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Type-B socket.

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alphacat

New Member
Hey,

I looked into Wiki and saw that there are several kinds of Type B socket:
- NEMA 5-15 (North American 15 A/125 V grounded)
- NEMA 5-20 (North American 20 A/125 V grounded)
- JIS C 8303, Class I (Japanese 15 A/100 V grounded)

How can I tell between the three?
My product has the following socket:


untitled-jpg.34207


How do i know which ones of the 3 groups this socket belongs to?

Thanks.
 

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MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I dunno, but if I saw the socket in your picture, the round pin would be earth safety ground (does not carry any current), the wide blade would be Neutral ( 0V, which is ultimately also connected to earth ground further back in the power distribution system), and the narrow blade would be Line (120V AC 60Hz). The power is taken between Line and Neutral. The Ground is used for safety only.
 
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alphacat

New Member
Thanks Mike.

I wonder, is there any way to find it out?

For example, in the product's specification file, i wanted to write the exact type of its outlet, but instead of just Type-B North American outlet, i'm not sure how to define it better.
 
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alphacat

New Member
Thank you very much Smanches.

According to the picture, I understand that the outlet my product comprises is Nema 5-15, am I correct please?

untitled-jpg.34217


I'd like to ask please, what makes Nema 5-30 to be able to carry up to 30Amp, compared to Nema 5-15 which is able to carry up to 15Amp?
Concenring the plug and the receptacle.
 

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smanches

New Member
I believe the 15A and 20A ratings are the minimums. I have lots of 20A 5-15s in my garage since the circuits themselves are 20A.

EDIT: Misread post the first time.

There is very little difference except for the outlet configuration. It's just to make sure you don't try to plug a 30A plug into a 15A socket. Inside they are probably almost identical.
 
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alphacat

New Member
I believe the 15A and 20A ratings are the minimums. I have lots of 20A 5-15s in my garage since the circuits themselves are 20A.

EDIT: Misread post the first time.

There is very little difference except for the outlet configuration. It's just to make sure you don't try to plug a 30A plug into a 15A socket. Inside they are probably almost identical.

Thanks.
mm you say that Nema 5-15 connector can handle 20Amps?

What prevents him to handle 30Amps?
I mean, there must be a difference that allow the 5-30 to carry more current, i'm trying to understand this difference.
 

smanches

New Member
Now that I think of it, I think I have 5-20s in the garage that also accept 5-15s. That's why they are rated for 20A.

The only difference there needs to be is the pin configuration. You cannot plug a 5-15 plug into a 5-20 or 5-30 receptacle. You cannot plug a 15-20 into a 15-30.

Although, some 5-20s can also accept 5-15's, as they can handle the current and it's not much different in style. 5-30s are a round pin arrangement that can only fit in a 5-30 receptacle.

The amount of current they can handle isn't a question of physical makeup (although 5-30s have slightly larger pins), but the decision of the making sure you don't plug an appliance that needs 30A into a receptacle that can only handle 15A.
 
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alphacat

New Member
Thank you very much again.

The amount of current they can handle isn't a question of physical makeup (although 5-30s have slightly larger pins)
Good to know that, thanks.

, but the decision of the making sure you don't plug an appliance that needs 30A into a receptacle that can only handle 15A.

What makes a socket (like a 5-15 socket) being able to handle up to 15Amps and no more than that?
Is it the socket itself?
Is it the wires inside the wall that arent thick enough?
 

smanches

New Member
There is nothing that actually limits the current to 15A. It's the fact that appliances which use a 5-15 plug should never use more than 15A. The current is regulated at the appliance side, not the plug side.
 
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