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TIA568A or TIA568B for home networks

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I vote TIA568A

This AT&T document votes 568B for a business


https://www.att.com/ecms/dam/att/business/help/pdf/2018/Inside_wiring_and_equipment_guide.pdf

1Gbps electrical port details•Port type—100BASE–T electrical Ethernet
•Cable or wire—Category 6 (CAT6) copper wire•
Connector type—RJ-45 (T568B wiring pattern)
Maximum distance—Up to 300 feet or 91 meters
Note: The distance from your router to the AT&T equipment in the building.
The distances listed provide a cushion for the actual wire distance limitations.
•Benefits—Easier installation•Limitations
Some susceptibility to interference. Greatest distance limitations


This
a.png


supports 568A

Why? For two lines, it matches the USOC assignments.

I think the reason why the pairs are so close is because the USOC 1 & 8 are too far apart.

I just wired by first cable to a patch panel and I used TIA568A.

I wired 4 jacks, maybe a year ago, one end, but I forget how they are wired. One has a RJ45 connector on it. That seems to wired 568B.

I guess, I should have used a 48port keystone panel or better yet a Siemon panel instead of like 8 ports together. See: https://www.datacomtools.com/cgi-datacomtools/sb/productsearch.cgi

https://www.siemon.com/ally/design_tools/guides/docs/z-max-6a-planning-installation-guide.pdf

Now is the time to do it over, but not sure I want to.

Anyway a search for which one to use yielded very different results..

==

Gigabit Ethernet

I believe, that a 4 pr "crossover" cable only crosses pins 1 & 2 and 3 & 6 because 1000baseT is, by definition Auto-MIDX,

Anyone care to confirm?
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Functionally, using 568A or 568B makes absolutely no difference at all, as long as both ends are the same. Electrically they are identical.
The only thing that matters is consistency, so you don't forget what you used if you need to reconnect anything...

Virtually everything now uses 568B colour code, so sticking with that keeps things consistent.

The reason the two inner pairs is like that is that originally only two pairs were allocated for Ethernet, for 10BaseT then 100Base T.
Pins 4 & 5 were used for a spare pair, left free to allow the same wiring to be used for telephones. An RJ11 plug fits the same socket and connect the centre pair as a phone line.

The idea was it could be unified wiring system, with each installed cable used for either data or voice depending how it was patched, or both with passive splitters.
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Just be sure if somebody is helping you install connectors, you both agree on which standard to follow. One of our installations was seriously delayed when every cable had the ends wired in the opposite standard. One guy did one end, the other guy the other end.
 

eTech

Well-Known Member
I vote TIA568A

This AT&T document votes 568B for a business


https://www.att.com/ecms/dam/att/business/help/pdf/2018/Inside_wiring_and_equipment_guide.pdf

1Gbps electrical port details•Port type—100BASE–T electrical Ethernet
•Cable or wire—Category 6 (CAT6) copper wire•
Connector type—RJ-45 (T568B wiring pattern)
Maximum distance—Up to 300 feet or 91 meters
Note: The distance from your router to the AT&T equipment in the building.
The distances listed provide a cushion for the actual wire distance limitations.
•Benefits—Easier installation•Limitations
Some susceptibility to interference. Greatest distance limitations


This
View attachment 129789


supports 568A

Why? For two lines, it matches the USOC assignments.

I think the reason why the pairs are so close is because the USOC 1 & 8 are too far apart.

I just wired by first cable to a patch panel and I used TIA568A.

I wired 4 jacks, maybe a year ago, one end, but I forget how they are wired. One has a RJ45 connector on it. That seems to wired 568B.

I guess, I should have used a 48port keystone panel or better yet a Siemon panel instead of like 8 ports together. See: https://www.datacomtools.com/cgi-datacomtools/sb/productsearch.cgi

https://www.siemon.com/ally/design_tools/guides/docs/z-max-6a-planning-installation-guide.pdf

Now is the time to do it over, but not sure I want to.

Anyway a search for which one to use yielded very different results..

==

Gigabit Ethernet

I believe, that a 4 pr "crossover" cable only crosses pins 1 & 2 and 3 & 6 because 1000baseT is, by definition Auto-MIDX,

Anyone care to confirm?
Gigabit Ethernet is actually 500mb full duplex with flow control. Never heard anything about a defining attribute as auto-mdx.

always used 568B.
Do you want to plug phones into rj45 jacks?

there is no standard for mdx/auto mdx. In fact,many times It doesn’t work between different brand devices.
 
Last edited:

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
QUOTE https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium-dependent_interface

Gigabit and faster Ethernet links over twisted pair cable use all four cable pairs for simultaneous transmission in both directions. For this reason, there are no dedicated transmit and receive pairs, and consequently, crossover cables are never required for 1000BASE-T communication

Subsequently, Dove promoted auto MDI-X within the 1000BASE-T standard[5] and also developed patented algorithms for "forced mode auto MDI-X" which allow a link to be automatically established even if the port does not auto-negotiatE

QUOTE https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_crossover_cable

Two pairs crossed, two pairs uncrossed 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX crossover

Half Crossed

Certain equipment or installations, including those in which phone and/or power are mixed with data in the same cable, may require that the "non-data" pairs 1 and 4 (pins 4, 5, 7 and 8) remain un-crossed. This is the most common kind of crossover cable.

Do you want to plug phones into rj45 jacks?
Sort of. Until I re-wire/wire the system, I'll have some quad stubs that will need to connect to an RJ45 patch panel.
Any totally re-wired or new phone jack will be CAT6 and RJ45 with an insert making it a 6P6C jack at the equipment end.
There will be an 1RU RJ45 Patch panel wired in parallel for telco patching.
 

Attachments

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
QUOTE https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI/TIA-568

ANSI/TIA-568 recommends the T568A pinout for horizontal cables. This pinout's advantage is that it is compatible with the 1-pair and 2-pair Universal Service Order Codes (USOC) pinouts. The U.S. Government requires it in federal contracts.[citation needed] The standard also allows the T568B pinout, as an alternative, "if necessary to accommodate certain 8-pin cabling systems". This pinout matches the older AT&T 258A (Systimax) pinout. In the 1990s, when the original TIA/EIA-568 was published, T568A had the most widely installed UTP cabling infrastructure. Many organizations still use T568B out of inertia.
 

eTech

Well-Known Member
QUOTE https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI/TIA-568

ANSI/TIA-568 recommends the T568A pinout for horizontal cables. This pinout's advantage is that it is compatible with the 1-pair and 2-pair Universal Service Order Codes (USOC) pinouts. The U.S. Government requires it in federal contracts.[citation needed] The standard also allows the T568B pinout, as an alternative, "if necessary to accommodate certain 8-pin cabling systems". This pinout matches the older AT&T 258A (Systimax) pinout. In the 1990s, when the original TIA/EIA-568 was published, T568A had the most widely installed UTP cabling infrastructure. Many organizations still use T568B out of inertia.
568B And 568A are electrically identical. Only the colors are different. I don’t believe the statement that 568A is the most widely used. Maybe federal government, but certainly not private sector or local government.

Also, the statement that crossover cables are never required for gigabit Ethernet is not true.at least in my 25 years in the industry.
 
Last edited:

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
QUOTE: http://www.proav.de/index.html?http&&&www.proav.de/data/cables/CAT5.html

The wiring standard is defined by TIA/EIA-568. In 1991 the first revision of the standard, TIA/EIA-568-A was released. In 2001 TIA/EIA-568-B was released. In 2008 (?) the new version TIA/EIA-568-C was released. The standard now defines that the wiring by color code 568-B is completely deprecated, not valid anymore. The only valid color code for structured wiring with twisted pair cable CAT 5/6/7 shall be the same color code as with the older 568-A !!
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Seems like much ado about nothing. As long as pairs are maintained, the electrons don't care about the colors of the wires. Use whatever makes you comfortable.
 

eTech

Well-Known Member
The rule of thumb is to use whatever standard is already installed. Unless you are going to change the entire cable system.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Seems like much ado about nothing. As long as pairs are maintained, the electrons don't care about the colors of the wires. Use whatever makes you comfortable
Electrons are color blind which is true.

Looks like 568A is the way I will go because of telco connection. I don't anticipate more than one line. There is a gazillio locatiions in the house. The system is basically now a 4 station cordless phone system. Had to have speakerphone and had to have touch tome. There is a UPS on the cordless base station and the phones can work about 12hrs or more on standby.

basement, living room (2), master bedroom. A "baby monitor" now moves the ring signal to the master bedrrom and the laundry room.
The system now is used primarily in intercom mode for a "nurse call" system. There were two external bells before the "nurse call" application. The "baby monitor" parent unit is not battery backed up. I can take a parental unit outside.

It's better than my cell. I can;t hear it using say a leaf blower.

Mom leave it off the charging cradle and so do I. In my case I can hear the ring through the baby monitor.

"off hook" which used to be a problem is fixed with a LED above the TV indicating "off hook"

"nurse call" is gong to get a little better by the addition of a Bellman % Symphon Home visit system. It has a bed shaker. led strobe and audio and a remote transmitter. The system needs to be sent for repair. Audio doesn't work. Later, I might add a pendant transmitter This would be if she drops the phone and is in a wheelchair. I have the B&S alarm clock version. I'm impossible to wake up.

I will eventually put back in place a "real phone" for mom accessible via a string and put the baby monitor on a UPS.

We had a power failure with a simultaneous failure of the base UPS and my cell wasn;t charged.
That's where the "real phone" and cell being charged will work in an emergency.

Asides:
I need to integrate some sort of LED based system for telco, doorbell(s) and nurse call in the master bedroom.

Lock, doorbell and vertical blinds are harder.

I need to do an AM radio. Messy. AM reception is horrible. Plan is a Nuvo tuner and an active antenna. There is an RG-6 cable to the attic and I'll start with trying to finding a place on the inside roof to mount it. Later, it will be put outside. The dual tuner can be controlled via RS232 and IR. I'd like to play it through the TV. presently beyound my pay grade.

Again screwed up. TV area is wired for telco and two TV lines and hard to fish. TV has wireless Internet Why? The old TV had a speakerphone built into it. It's very difficult to fish.

Just finished 1/2 of the planned power distribution for the hospital bed which I plan to write up here.
 
Last edited:

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The rule of thumb is to use whatever standard is already installed. Unless you are going to change the entire cable system.
Agreed. Guess what? The system is "newish".
My printer was acting up, internet speed was crappy and it turned out to be a long printer cable just thrown over suspended ceiling and an I-beam with connectors on both ends. It was the first thing I punched down on a previously mounted patch panel.

I need to add a few of these:
1613740640233.png


I have run 4 cables to the master bedroom near the TV, but only one has a connector wired TIA568B that can plug into a switch. They are not tidy. The wall side then is wired TIA568B. I need tor run at least 4 more to the opposite side of the room.

Once these are in place, wiring to the master bedroom and printers will be easier. One should have telco for faxxing. it currently operating wireless and needs to be repaired. Scanner part is broken.

More important, I think, is upgrading the same type of cable that runs from my modem to the router,
 
Last edited:

eTech

Well-Known Member
Agreed. Guess what? The system is "newish".
My printer was acting up, internet speed was crappy and it turned out to be a long printer cable just thrown over suspended ceiling and an I-beam with connectors on both ends. It was the first thing I punched down on a previously mounted patch panel.

I need to add a few of these:
View attachment 129804


I have run 4 cables to the master bedroom near the TV, but only one has a connector wired TIA568B that can plug into a switch. They are not tidy. The wall side then is wired TIA568B. I need tor run at least 4 more to the opposite side of the room.
Is this for a home?

If so, I would use 568B because its more easily available. Otherwise, you may find yourself using 568B anyway in certain situations.
I have separate cable systems/jacks. Wall plates have one RJ45 for Gig Ethernet and RJ11 for analog phone (although the phone jacks are rarely used anymore).
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Just be sure if somebody is helping you install connectors, you both agree on which standard to follow. One of our installations was seriously delayed when every cable had the ends wired in the opposite standard. One guy did one end, the other guy the other end.
That's funny. I had a "similar" problem. Lab Equipment got damaged. It was traced to an outlet made by pass & Seymore. they used brass and plated steel and the ground was purely mechanical and dependent on the manufacture of the base. As it turned out, the ground could let go when two devices were used. Because of the line filters, this would put 60 VAC (1/2 of 120V) on the ground of the other device.

I developed a quick test using an outlet tester with a ground <0.5 ohms test and a plug or any power cord. Insert both and wiggle the cord. Switch outlets and repeat. See if ground lamp goes off.

Now, 420 outlets have the potential of being bad. The decision made was to:
1. Blanket Replace all LAB outlets. Replace Ivory colored outlets with brown.
2. Identify all hall circuits that are not on lab circuits and replace those.
3. Mark all hall circuits on lab circuits with green and red dots. green meant janitor could use for buffer etc.
4. Check and replace outlets connected to office computers, copiers etc. PC's were not common in offices yet.
5. As devices were added, the outlets were checked and replaced as needed.
6. No one even identified the bad outlets. You might have to remove bookcases etc to get access.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Is this for a home?
yes.

If so, I would use 568B because its more easily available. Otherwise, you may find yourself using 568B anyway in certain situations.
Nearly everything I've seen can be wired either way.

I have separate cable systems/jacks. Wall plates have one RJ45 for Gig Ethernet and RJ11 for analog phone (although the phone jacks are rarely used anymore).
Plan to eventually re-wire or new telco stuff in CAT6 using RJ45 jacks and these

1613743282235.png

Inserts. https://www.l-com.com/ethernet-modular-8x8-insert-adapter-pkg-10

Gig Ethernet is on the horizon. I have a 24port POE switch that I need to install.

It looks like one of the better ways to do patch panels is with Keystone connectors. They would be easier to wire in my case.

The Siemon Z-max connectors seem really cool. They can be purchased for D openings and their proprietary openings.

I'm using a 48 port patch panel that uses these
1613743992020.png


punch downs.

This

1613744516516.png

is my patch panel. The patch panel rotates with stops for access to the back.

Currently, above the patch panel is a bunch of RJ45's. They are plugged directly into two small switches. One is a 5 port gigabit switch, the other a hub. They are on a shelf.

Red would be parallel RJ45's for telco. There is a router mounted on DIN rail. Near the router attached to the red wire is a POE device that powers a DSL modem elsewhere.

On the lower right hand corner, grey box,
there is a bunch of telco wires. The white covered box is telco and just under it is a stand-alone bell.
 

eTech

Well-Known Member
Nearly everything I've seen can be wired either way.
What I mean is....your going thru the trouble of using 568A standard. You might find yourself using 568B components (like patch cables) because you couldn't find 568A quick enough.

Plan to eventually re-wire or new telco stuff in CAT6 using RJ45 jacks and these

View attachment 129805

Inserts. https://www.l-com.com/ethernet-modular-8x8-insert-adapter-pkg-10
Hadn't seen those before, but never had a need for them.

Gig Ethernet is on the horizon. I have a 24port POE switch that I need to install.

It looks like one of the better ways to do patch panels is with Keystone connectors. They would be easier to wire in my case.

The Siemon Z-max connectors seem really cool. They can be purchased for D openings and their proprietary openings.

I'm using a 48 port patch panel that uses these
View attachment 129806


punch downs.
Yes. Those are reliable and a defacto standard. Be sure to get CAT6 certified patch panels. The panel mounting holes should match any planned mounting pattern, like those in a short wall mounted open frame rack. If your pulling cable, make sure the termination blocks will accommodate the type of CAT6 cable you use. I'm assuming UTP CAT6.

You might want to add a cable management panel to help with the routing of cables..

This

View attachment 129807

is my patch panel. The patch panel rotates with stops for access to the back.

Currently, above the patch panel is a bunch of RJ45's. They are plugged directly into two small switches. One is a 5 port gigabit switch, the other a hub. They are on a shelf.

Red would be parallel RJ45's for telco. There is a router mounted on DIN rail. Near the router attached to the red wire is a POE device that powers a DSL modem elsewhere.

On the lower right hand corner, grey box,
there is a bunch of telco wires. The white covered box is telco and just under it is a stand-alone bell.
Wow...you need to clean that up... :)
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

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Most Helpful Member
Wow...you need to clean that up
Remember, that "mess" is in the ceiling. That is cleaned up.

There is a QNAP server in the ceiling too. Plan is to put a 1 RU 24 port switch accessable to the patch panel. Cables are secured using velcro ties with a hole that mounts them.

I really like using DIN rail to mount stuff. I found out the hard way that you he to have the DIN rail about 1/8" off the wood. If there is a leak (bathroom is nearby), water will follow the channel formed by the top of the rail and he wood.

The white dome is an Apple snow airport. My initial network was a dial-up wireless internet. I got free dial-up. Because runnning cable was difficult to the modem, I used powerline Ethenet on the WAN port to reach the modem. The wireless Access point is where it needs to be (In the center of the house in the basement)

Unfortunately, I needed a repeater (This was 802.11b) to reach the living room. Line of sight is severely attenuated. The repeater was placed about 10 feet from where the laptop normally was used. Getting outside on the swing or porch was impossible without the repeater. The earth and a shed severely attenuated the signal. The repeater has clear access to the porch through a window about 20 feet away.

My power line over Ethernet was a Neverwire unit. It was reliable when it worked, but it died twice. Repairable under warranty once.

Since I modem upgrade, I realized the importance of DIN rail. I don;t have any near the NID. I generally have two modems availabe.One I use and is configured in bridge mode. The other is configured standalone. when it's time to troubleshoot with y ISP, I need to be standalone and direct connected. I put a jack near the washer, so I'm not plugging into the ceiling. I did too much damage causing the laptop to fall 3 feet when I had to plug an RJ45 into the ceiling mounted modem.

I have a 3-port RS232 controlled RJ45 AB switch made by Electrostandards that is certified to gigabit speeds. "Planss" are to use one port to switch t the DSL line and another to switch the Ethernet so I can electrically swap the modems. I might wire a direct port to my bedroom. If I do it by wireless, I'll need a repeater.
 

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