• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Terms and Conditions at AAC - funny

Status
Not open for further replies.

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A friend over at AAC just pointed me to this article on AAC's home page and a thread.

https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/pr...gentleman-maker-photon-trebuchet-ir-detector/

A guy builds a trebuchet to kill intruders... Triggered by an ultrasonic sensor.

Since the site's terms and conditions of use policy bans discussions of rail guns and such, a thread was locked for asking about it.

https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/...out-an-aac-article-and-it-got-deleted.152602/

Article is still up on AAC but nobody is allowed to discuss it.

Funny.
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
AAC has always been like..here is a picture of a gun with a working video.

Do.not.build.this. It.could.kill.you.

That's AAC

Website owners are scared of everything in case they are held liable.

Silly site that once rocked.
Long ago.

lol
 
Last edited:

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My thread on how to cook hot dogs using 120 VAC was very short lived.

My serious issue is that what one moderator sees as fine the next guy can't close the thread fast enough. I mean really, how many things have gone to trial over someone reading an Internet article? While I agree moderation is necessary in any forum and whoever owns the sand box can set their own rules it helps when moderation is all on the same channel and for moderation to occasionally admit they are wrong on something.

Incidentally I have cooked single hot dogs, one at a time, using 120 VAC. I like stainless nails and never use galvanized nails as they leave a bitter taste in the ends of the hot dogs. :)

Ron
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My thread on how to cook hot dogs using 120 VAC was very short lived.

My serious issue is that what one moderator sees as fine the next guy can't close the thread fast enough. I mean really, how many things have gone to trial over someone reading an Internet article? While I agree moderation is necessary in any forum and whoever owns the sand box can set their own rules it helps when moderation is all on the same channel and for moderation to occasionally admit they are wrong on something.

Incidentally I have cooked single hot dogs, one at a time, using 120 VAC. I like stainless nails and never use galvanized nails as they leave a bitter taste in the ends of the hot dogs. :)

Ron

The guy who started thread on AAC ( in post 1 of this thread) got banned on AAC for asking about the catapult security system article on their own site - but the catapult security system article is still up! What a site!
 

JonSea

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My thread on how to cook hot dogs using 120 VAC was very short lived.

My serious issue is that what one moderator sees as fine the next guy can't close the thread fast enough. I mean really, how many things have gone to trial over someone reading an Internet article? While I agree moderation is necessary in any forum and whoever owns the sand box can set their own rules it helps when moderation is all on the same channel and for moderation to occasionally admit they are wrong on something.

Incidentally I have cooked single hot dogs, one at a time, using 120 VAC. I like stainless nails and never use galvanized nails as they leave a bitter taste in the ends of the hot dogs. :)

Ron
We did this in the Cub Scouts. It was a project in the guidebook.
 

JonSea

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I think posting projects like electrocuting hotdogs is ok, as long as appropriate cautions/warnings are given.

In a Facebook electronics group, some guy was going on about using a capacitive dropper from 230V to power a preamp. He ignored a number of comments that his circuit was hazardous, and didn't understand why anyone was concerned.

Eventually, he built the circuit and was amazed that the output was live at 230VAC. What a surprise.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
We did this in the Cub Scouts. It was a project in the guidebook.
Well I'll be! :)

My link was to one of many stories involving Carl & Jerry which ran in monthly Popular Electronics magazines during the 50s and early 60s. Really cool stuff for the day and each month I waited for my dad's copy in the mailbox. Many of the projects wouldn't fly today but back then low voltage was only used to light tube filaments, well before the 9 volt transistor radio. :) The story also stresses the importance of safety but apparently over zealous moderation never actually read or more importantly understood the point. I cooked many a hot dog that way and never knew it was actually a cub scout project, pretty cool really.

Ron
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The guy who started thread on AAC ( in post 1 of this thread) got banned on AAC for asking about the catapult security system article on their own site - but the catapult security system article is still up! What a site!
Oh I am shocked and amazed! No wait, not really. :) Damn Gopher it's starting to get cold up our way.

Has Spinnaker been around? Haven't seen him in quite awhile. Hope things in your corner of PA are treating you well.

Ron
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
My link was to one of many stories involving Carl & Jerry which ran in monthly Popular Electronics magazines during the 50s and early 60s.
Around that time I used to bum the old copies from the US servicemen I knew that lived around off base.
Particularly the sister Mag. Practical Mechanics.!
Max.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Around that time I used to bum the old copies from the US servicemen I knew that lived around off base.
Particularly the sister Mag. Practical Mechanics.!
Max.
It was a time when people would read much more and magazines which featured good articles were just plain interesting. Like early radio stories. For example listening to radio when the Lone Ranger stepped on a twig you could hear it snap and when you closed your eyes you could see the story unfold. Really cool stuff.

Ron
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Has Spinnaker been around? Haven't seen him in quite awhile. Hope things in your corner of PA are treating you well.

Believe it or not, spinner and I just met for dinner tonight. He Moves on to bigger and better hobbies for the summer - he is usually back when the snow falls. All is well. Also, remember that cold is relative. I was in Minnesota last week and they had morning frost! Just as the frost melted off, the winds picked up. What a cold day.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Believe it or not, spinner and I just met for dinner tonight. He Moves on to bigger and better hobbies for the summer - he is usually back when the snow falls. All is well. Also, remember that cold is relative. I was in Minnesota last week and they had morning frost! Just as the frost melted off, the winds picked up. What a cold day.
Nice to know things are going along well and I see you are still shuttling back and forth from PA to Minnesota . :)

Ron
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
FWIW, AAC has never really "done it" for me.
I have always felt much more comfortable at ETO, rather than at AAC.
We do have a number of members in common who provide a great deal of help on both forums, along with exclusive members on both sites, but although our goal/target audience is focused on the same/similar subjects, the atmosphere is quite different, IMO.
Here appears to be much more relaxed and go-with-the-flow, as opposed to minding your p's and q's.
If an analogy fits the scenario better, I would say that AAC is, to me, like visiting your In-Laws, and ETO is like going round to one or your friend's homes.

My 0.02
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Way back a few years ago......there was a problem here
ETO has survived.

Were all the same.
Ron and Nigel and KISS and Clyde and Der Strom and Jim and the backbone of ETO still here.
So many nice people that tolerate my rants.

Too much crap happening here where I am.

Ive many fond memories of all the goodness here at ETO.
Like ive always said...and i will repeat it:

The very best of the best hang out at ETO.
Cause we know stuff. And we are not scared to share knowledge
We dont guess
Were not scared to talk if we know we can help.

We not sure....we stay silent.

.

ETO has a reputation for excellence with help.

Im proud to be associated with ETO.
:):):):)
 

MichaelaJoy

Active Member
As far as the OP is concerned, I can see that it's a joke, but if you do it in New York, it's a felony (IIRC, it's called a shot-trap)

The problem is that some idiot may do it and hurt some innocent person.

I'm not talking about building a Trebuchet, but something more sinister.
I won't elaborate because I don't want to plant any bad seeds. ;)

ETO has a reputation for excellence with help.

Im proud to be associated with ETO.
I had the same feeling when I first started prowling around here. Really sharp people who are willing to share what they know with others.

That's why I joined. :)

Besides. Sites like this one are the 'front line' in the war on ignorance and laziness.

Just my thoughts...
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I like stainless nails and never use galvanized nails as they leave a bitter taste in the ends of the hot dogs. :)

I don't think I noticed this last sentence in your post, Ron.

Bitter taste from galvanized nails would a short term concern (bad taste), assuming repeated use, the long-term worry would be that older zinc was contaminated with Cadmium. That is why galvanized refrigerator shelves were banned back in the 1970s. People put their food directly on the shelves and, over the decades, develop some industrial disease.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I don't think I noticed this last sentence in your post, Ron.

Bitter taste from galvanized nails would a short term concern (bad taste), assuming repeated use, the long-term worry would be that older zinc was contaminated with Cadmium. That is why galvanized refrigerator shelves were banned back in the 1970s. People put their food directly on the shelves and, over the decades, develop some industrial disease.
Where were you when I thought playing with mercury was fun? :) Now that you mention it and I never gave it a thought, is why galvanized refrigerator shelves were banned back in the 1970s. You chemistry guys sure come in handy.

The hot dog cooker went back to a 1959 issue of Popular Electronics which my dad subscribed to and as a kid I loved reading the old issues and building projects. I forget the numbers but while a single hot dog starts out slow as it heats up and the salts get going the current exceeds an amp.

Hope you and yours have a great new year.

Ron
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The original story as I read it in 1959.
http://bearblain.com/images/223 Primer Test.png

I like some of the comments from Evil Mad Scientist:
Never ever take electricity directly out of your outlet without an isolating transformer (1:1). Never. Suggesting or even showing how to do this is totaly BS. Never do it. The hotdog will probably explode and shoot one of the power cords onto your lap. Or you will touch one of the cords without pulling the plug beforehand. Or something else which will lead to injury or death. Simply don’t do it.
Give me a break. The hot dog(s) are not going to explode. I wonder if the person posting this is aware that before low voltage there was a world of vacuum tubes (valves) and every simple home radio used B+? Should I take every appliance in my house and but a pile of isolation transformers to power everything isolated? A warning is adequate and unless you understand electricity you should not screw with it but the same can be said of many things. You do not ground yourself and urinate in a wall outlet or as we said years ago you don't pee on B+. Safety and good work practices are fine but going ballistic over a novel method to cook a hot dog is overboard. The above quote reflects a total lack of knowledge.

The original 1959 link stresses safety and also describes how a safety interlock was installed in the cooker. There is nothing unsafe about it.

Ron
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top