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Solder sucker

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hello and welcome to ETO.

A solder sucker removes solder from an area that you don't want it....as in removing parts from a Printed Circuit Board. In order for a solder sucker to work it needs a device to heat up the area are working on.

Some use a soldering iron and others hot air to accomplish the task of making the solder semi liquid or melted.

Than you simply "load"...ha ha...I mean prep the solder sucker and push the button....while aiming at the solder you want "sucked" and all done.

Takes practice to get the timing right. Some find it easy... others not.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My solder sucker looks like yours, Nigel, but it is blue and is about 48 years old. I replaced its nozzle tip a few times.
When I bought it its cost was nowhere as expensive as it is today.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
My solder sucker looks like yours, Nigel, but it is blue and is about 48 years old. I replaced its nozzle tip a few times.
When I bought it its cost was nowhere as expensive as it is today.
If I remember correctly?, the blue ones came with a wider nozzle, and the green with a thinner nozzle - they aren't interchangeable as you also need to change the metal pin that cleans the nozzle when you load it.

Mine was used for full time service work, and I've gone though a huge number of nozzles over the years, and also used to regularly replace the washer inside as well - that's the good thing about buying one that has spares support.
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Oryx. Simply the best tool for removing solder.

It's weak point is that it has no protection saving the shaft if you drop it. You cannot fix that.

Plus, it sometimes hits you in the eye while you're using it lol.

 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Many years ago. I worked in a factory. The girls had soldering irons, solder wick, pots full of molten solder, rolls of solder. No one had seen a solder sucker.
A tool salesman came with new tools. He handed out the solder suckers for every one to try. "What is this thing." "Its a solder sucker". The girl put the point of the sucker in the solder pot and pushed the button. The solder sucker got too hot to hold. She dropped it on the desk. Filled with two pounds of molten solder the sucker laid on the desk shriveled up and died.
119250
The girls and the engineers often had conversations with little comprehension.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
The girl put the point of the sucker in the solder pot and pushed the button. The solder sucker got too hot to hold. She dropped it on the desk. Filled with two pounds of molten solder the sucker laid on the desk shriveled up and died.
Gave me a laugh!
JimB
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member

I used a blue one here. Sucks solder like crazy. Than.... someone broke it and that was that.
All plastic but If you know what your doing with it it's a solder removal tool of note.

Wooosh... click..solder joint has not a sign of solder left.
 

narkeleptk

Member
I prefer good wick mostly and a desoldering gun occasionally. The manual solder suckers I used to get seamed like they were only good for a few projects before falling apart or maybe I was just getting poor quality ones.
 

tvtech

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As a TV tech on CRT, a solder sucker is an essential tool. CRT techs repair boards. We don't just swap them.

Think of us as old time panel beaters on cars.
Where knowledge of how to repair was key.

New non CRT are made for board swapping. No skills required really.
 

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