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Simpson 260 Series 6

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Hank2

New Member
I'm a new guy here with a question. I have a Simpson 260 Series 6 that has stopped reading. I replaced both batteries and examined the 1A fuse. It appears fine. When I jump across the fuse clamps using a screwdriver the meter will read on the continuity setting. Have not tried any others. I have replaced the 1A fuse but still no go.

I cannot locate the 2A fuse to check it. The manual says that it is located under the printed circuit board. Can anyone point me in the right direction? Thanks
 
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MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi,

You seem to be saying that you replace the 1A fuse and it DOES NOT help, but when you JUMP the 1A fuse it DOES help.
So it sounds like the 1A fuse is not making good contact with the fuse holder, or the fuse blows out as soon as you replace it, or the fuse used to replace it is no good.

If you jump the 1A fuse and it works then you should not have to replace the 2A fuse. If on the other hand you jump the 2A fuse to get it to work then yes you probably have to replace the 2 Amp fuse. That may require a little disassembly. I would think it would tell you in the manual how to replace the fuse.

I have a Simpson 160 made sometime in the 1970's. They were good meters even back then.
 
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Dean Huster

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure where Simson started, but with either the Series 6, 7 or the current Series 8, they began putting TWO fuses in series to take care of their CAT II, III or whatever rating. The fuse you're seeing is a 1A, 250v fuse whereas the second fuse they added is more like 2A rated at 600v. But both the fuses were in the same area near the 9v battery.
 

Hank2

New Member
Thanks Al and Dean and nix everything I said. I bought a cheap GE meter to finish something I was working on. Out of curiosity I swapped the Simpson leads for the GE. The positive Simpson lead is bad. I don't know how it happened. This meter sits in a cabinet the majority of the time. I have really enjoyed having this meter and I'm very relieved all I need is a new set of leads.
 
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MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi,


Oh ok ha ha, that will be a problem too :)

I've had alligator jumpers stop working properly too, with the wire being broken on the inside of the insulation so you cant see that it is actually broken.

What i do now is pull gently on the wires to see if they "stretch" holding one of the alligator clips in one hand and the wire in the other or even the other alligator clip on the other end of the wire. If the wire does not stretch with reasonable force then it is probably ok, but if it does stretch that's because the insulation stretches quite easily while the wire being broken inside doesnt stop it from stretching anymore. A good wire wont stretch.

There's also the low ohms test too. Check the wire with an ohm meter that goes down to tens of milliohms or better yet down to milliohms. Alternately, run a decent level test current through the wire and check the voltage drop across the wire.
 
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Hank2

New Member
Thanks Al. I started looking for a set of Simpson replacements lead, these are Catalog No. 00125, but I haven't found them yet.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
when i was a calibrator in the Army, these meters were being used by the motor pools, and it seemed that we would get 10 of these per week for repair, always the large cartridge fuse was blown. it seemed the motor pool techs would forget the meter was set for reading current or resistance, and would then try to check the battery voltage....
 
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