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Shipping products with leadacid batteries

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Cicero

Active Member
Hi chaps,

Looking for shipping advice and experience, namely internationally out of the UK by air.

We have a new battery powered product, which runs off a std 12V 7Ah leadacid battery internal to the machine - https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/lead-acid-rechargeable-batteries/5375488/ as an example.

These batteries are not travel restricted, but I'm trying to make sure we dont have any problems.

As I understand it, the package only needs to have the following printed on it.
Contains Single UN2800 Battery, wet, non spillable.
  • By Air are NOT restricted under special provision A67
  • By Road are NOT restricted under special provision 598
However, can the batteries be connected internally inside the machine, and isolated with a switch? Or do I need to remove them completely? I'm hoping to leave them internal and connected, but isolated with the switch. That way the customer doesn't need to go to the hassle of connecting them up and whatnot.

Any other documentation that needs to ship with them?
 

Ylli

Active Member
Sounds like questions you really should be asking the carrier. Here in the US, there are different rules if you ship via US postal service, or one of the private carriers (UPS, FedX, DHL, etc).
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
However, can the batteries be connected internally inside the machine, and isolated with a switch? Or do I need to remove them completely?
Don't know the rules, but they may not matter if an inspector isn't able to discern this by glancing at it.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I'm hoping to leave them internal and connected, but isolated with the switch.
OK, but what are the consequences of the unit being switched on (by whatever means) while in transit?
Will it just result in a discharged and may be ruined battery?
or
Will the device do something awkward and embarrassing?

That way the customer doesn't need to go to the hassle of connecting them up and whatnot.
How difficult is it to connect the battery?
Is it a major operation involving lots of tools to gain access to the battery?
or
Is it a quick two turns of a screwdriver on a couple of Dzus type fasteners.

Would you expect the end user to be capable of doing this, or are the end users electrically incompetent?


I think that my thinking is more design review oriented, rather than shipping logistics.

JimB
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
This will be between you and the carrier which will apply any domestic and international rules. Within the US products can be shipped with a disconnected lead acid battery. I have bought commercial UPS units which shipped this way. Anyway, here nor there, it is between you, your carrier and any laws or rules which apply.

Ron
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It is FIRST between you and IMDG (if going by sea) and
Hi chaps,

Looking for shipping advice and experience, namely internationally out of the UK by air.

We have a new battery powered product, which runs off a std 12V 7Ah leadacid battery internal to the machine - https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/lead-acid-rechargeable-batteries/5375488/ as an example.

These batteries are not travel restricted, but I'm trying to make sure we dont have any problems.

As I understand it, the package only needs to have the following printed on it.


However, can the batteries be connected internally inside the machine, and isolated with a switch? Or do I need to remove them completely? I'm hoping to leave them internal and connected, but isolated with the switch. That way the customer doesn't need to go to the hassle of connecting them up and whatnot.

Any other documentation that needs to ship with them?

If you are shipping that to the US or by air (IATA), the definition of a non-spillable battery is a battery that does not contain a flowable liquid (e.g. AGM or gel). A sealed lead acid battery is still spillable because liquid will flow if the case cracks (no matter how improbable you think that might be).

Also, most countries (all countries?) require the person that prepares a shipment that contains hazardous materials to be trained by a competent authority. All documentation of the training must be available to the authorities if there is any accident (crash or spill). The fines for violation are HUGE. Shipping hazardous materials is just not something a real company figures out but asking on an ELECTRONICS forum or ANY FORUM. hire someone who knows, who is authorized to sign the shipping papers and KNOWS HOW TO DO IT RIGHT.
 
Last edited:

Western

Member
Shipping hazardous materials is just not something a real company figures out but asking on an ELECTRONICS forum or ANY FORUM. hire someone who knows, who is authorized to sign the shipping papers and KNOWS HOW TO DO IT RIGHT.
Fair go !!! ... Seemed like a legitimate question to me. :)

Is it only 'real' companies that know everything?
 

Cicero

Active Member
Thanks for the responses so far, we/I do intend to ask our carrier and hazmat shipping team, I was merely after some experience from others in this regard for my own benefit.

OK, but what are the consequences of the unit being switched on (by whatever means) while in transit?
Will it just result in a discharged and may be ruined battery?
or
Will the device do something awkward and embarrassing?


How difficult is it to connect the battery?
Is it a major operation involving lots of tools to gain access to the battery?
or
Is it a quick two turns of a screwdriver on a couple of Dzus type fasteners.

Would you expect the end user to be capable of doing this, or are the end users electrically incompetent?


I think that my thinking is more design review oriented, rather than shipping logistics.

JimB
Understandable questions Jim...there's a rocker switch, and a power enable keyswitch on board. With the rocker on, its only a uA current draw, so both need to be on for any significant current discharge...which is impossible as the key wont be shipped in the keyswitch.

Its not particularly difficult to disconnect/change, but it is a hassle and this is a portable piece of equipment. A screwdriver and some time is all you need to access the battery compartment.

It is FIRST between you and IMDG (if going by sea) and

If you are shipping that to the US or by air (IATA), the definition of a non-spillable battery is a battery that does not contain a flowable liquid (e.g. AGM or gel). A sealed lead acid battery is still spillable because liquid will flow if the case cracks (no matter how improbable you think that might be).

Also, most countries (all countries?) require the person that prepares a shipment that contains hazardous materials to be trained by a competent authority. All documentation of the training must be available to the authorities if there is any accident (crash or spill). The fines for violation are HUGE. Shipping hazardous materials is just not something a real company figures out but asking on an ELECTRONICS forum or ANY FORUM. hire someone who knows, who is authorized to sign the shipping papers and KNOWS HOW TO DO IT RIGHT.
Didn't expect this hostile tone to be honest, and I don't think its necessary. I presume you're simply trying to drill down that this isn't something to mess around with, but thinking I'm some cowboy is a presumption on your part. I'm just wanting to do my own research, as its handy knowing these things as an engineer, to consider during the design process of products like these. There are people on this forum, and other forums, who have years of expertise in several different fields and don't mind sharing that expertise and experience, its part of the reason why I like frequenting them and asking the odd question here and there.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Didn't expect this hostile tone to be honest, and I don't think its necessary. I presume you're simply trying to drill down that this isn't something to mess around with, but thinking I'm some cowboy is a presumption on your part. I'm just wanting to do my own research, as its handy knowing these things as an engineer, to consider during the design process of products like these. There are people on this forum, and other forums, who have years of expertise in several different fields and don't mind sharing that expertise and experience, its part of the reason why I like frequenting them and asking the odd question here and there.
I don't waste any emotion on people I don't know. Don't confuse my clarity for hostility -unless you want to.
 

Cicero

Active Member
I don't waste any emotion on people I don't know. Don't confuse my clarity for hostility -unless you want to.
Your "clarity" is not appreciated, its not a helpful addition to the question at hand, nor the place it was coming from. I pity anyone who has to work under you.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Fair go !!! ... Seemed like a legitimate question to me. :)

Is it only 'real' companies that know everything?
Real companies do things correctly and still make a profit or they realize they are not a real company and close their doors. Fake companies are doing things on the cheap, not understanding the risks they bring to the environment, to other people on the highway or to passengers and crew in the planes they are using to ship their wares and because they are taking risks and have lower costs, they can undercut the quotes of their competitors. It has nothing to do with knowing anything. It is all about doing things correctly.
 

JonSea

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It is FIRST between you and IMDG (if going by sea) and



If you are shipping that to the US or by air (IATA), the definition of a non-spillable battery is a battery that does not contain a flowable liquid (e.g. AGM or gel). A sealed lead acid battery is still spillable because liquid will flow if the case cracks (no matter how improbable you think that might be).

Also, most countries (all countries?) require the person that prepares a shipment that contains hazardous materials to be trained by a competent authority. All documentation of the training must be available to the authorities if there is any accident (crash or spill). The fines for violation are HUGE. Shipping hazardous materials is just not something a real company figures out but asking on an ELECTRONICS forum or ANY FORUM. hire someone who knows, who is authorized to sign the shipping papers and KNOWS HOW TO DO IT RIGHT.

I see absolutely nothing wrong with asking about others' experiences. People who have actually jumped through the hoops of doing this may have some valuable insights into the pitfalls along the way. Someone's real-world experience might be very enlightening. Asking the question here doesn't preclude talking to the shipper to understand their requirements.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I see absolutely nothing wrong with asking about others' experiences. People who have actually jumped through the hoops of doing this may have some valuable insights into the pitfalls along the way. Someone's real-world experience might be very enlightening. Asking the question here doesn't preclude talking to the shipper to understand their requirements.
Nothing wrong with asking but, unless he is getting an actual categorization of the actual hazard class, packing group and detailed packing and labeling requirements from a qualified individual, all the advice and answers are meaningless and, therefore, useless.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Err ... ok then :)

I'm a bit thick ... maybe you can explain to me how do I make sure I'm doing things correctly ... without knowing anything.

See, it gets tricky, doesn't it.

And see your previous post about only "real" companies knowing things - did you forget already?

.
 
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