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scope probes

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ghostman11

Well-Known Member
sorry if i am about to sound stupid but..............

am i right in thinking that you can fit any probe to a scope as long as it is the same bandwidth??

the reason i ask is because in order to learn as much as i can i was fortunate enough to come accross a scope that i could afford, however i need some probes for it and i cant seem to find any specificaly for that scope,
the scope in question is a wayne kerr 100 Mhz Dual Channel DTV 100. aslo i would very much appreciate any thoughts on what you think of this model or brand of scope.
sorry in advance to be a pain
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It doesn't even have to be the same bandwidth. Just keep in mind what the bandwidth bottleneck actually is.
 

ghostman11

Well-Known Member
lol i cant belive i have spent so much time trying to track down the right probes when there was no need :D any thoughts or recomendations on what probes to get??.
 

The Electrician

Active Member
Get something like this. I have two of them, and they actually have a bandwidth more like 200 MHz, rather than just 100 MHz.

**broken link removed**
 

ghostman11

Well-Known Member
thank you i will give them a try :D, anyone have any thoughts on the make and model of scope and if it would make a good general purpose scope
 

kchriste

New Member
Forum Supporter
am i right in thinking that you can fit any probe to a scope as long as it is the same bandwidth??
As long as the input capacitance and input impedance are compatible with the probe. ie: A x10 probe designed for a scope with 1MΩ input impedance would turn into a x100 probe on a scope with 100KΩ input impedance assuming the frequency compensation adjustment was compatible.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Those Tek probes on Ebay The Electrician suggested are nice since they have a switch to go between 1:1 and 10:1 modes. That way you can use a 10:1 mode when you need a high input impedance or a 1:1 mode when you want maximum sensitivity.
 
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