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schottky diode

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kinjalgp

Active Member
It is a high speed switching diode generally used for switching applications. It has very low recovery time thus can be switched on/off more number of times per second than a normal P-N junction diode.
 

Dean Huster

Well-Known Member
Hot carrier diodes

Shottky diodes, aka "hot carrier diodes", are often used as the rectifiers in high-efficiency power supplies, such as SMPS or "switchers" as they're commonly called. Their lower forward drop increases the efficiency by not having that power loss just from the rectification process. Shottkys are not perfect by any means. Although they have a low forward drop, they also suffer from a lower reverse resistance than silicon diodes which can be problematic in some circuitry, so you have to use them with care.

Dean
 

jrsweger

New Member
First let me apologize for dragging this post out of the archives.

My question is can a regular diode (don't know the p/n but it was purchased at radio shack) be used as a direct replacement for a Schottky Diode p/n IR1F? It's just been too long for me to remember the why's and why not's for this.
 

Roff

Well-Known Member
jrsweger said:
First let me apologize for dragging this post out of the archives.

My question is can a regular diode (don't know the p/n but it was purchased at radio shack) be used as a direct replacement for a Schottky Diode p/n IR1F? It's just been too long for me to remember the why's and why not's for this.
A Google search led me to this datasheet. Go to the end of the datasheet to see the IR1F marking. Does it look like your part?
I doubt that a manufacturer would design in a Schottky diode unless it were needed, but we would have to know the application and/or see the schematic to be certain.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Repeat: An ordinary diode (rectifier?) has a much slower switching speed and a much higher forward voltage drop than a Schottky.
 

jrsweger

New Member
Unfortunately, I don't have a schematic for the circuit in question. Here's the rub, this is from a video card (bfg5600ultra) that someone in a totally different forum was asking about. All they could provide was a picture and not a good one at that. What happened is they knocked this part off of the card and didn't realize it (subsequently the part was lost) and now they are trying to fix the card (or at least replace the part). We do not know exactly what the part number of the part is. The reference designator for this part was D505 (I know that doesn't make any bit of difference except it denotes it was a diode). Immediately to the left of this part was another diode that was marked IR1F. All I did was make the assumption (I think a pretty safe one) that the missing part was the same part number.

I've already looked up the data sheet for the IR1F and am reasonably certain that at least the packaging of the part (it is surface mount) is the same.

I wish I at least could put my fingers on this card so I could try to trace out part of the circuit (as long as it's not multilayer). That would at least give me a better warm and fuzzy. I have no idea where this person lives (I think in Canada) and he went to Radio Shack and they sold him a diode (I'm fairly certain it is not a Schottky) and now he is saying that the area that this part is located is getting warm. I advised him to not use the card and get the correct part (or at least an equivalent part (I didn't think that packaging would make a difference)) and replace the part again.

BTW I have read up on the differences and I Googled the heck out of this before I stumbled on this forum. Like I said, I just forget the why's and why not's. I haven't done any design type stuff or component selection stuff for close to 25 years when I was in tech school. I also realize that knowing the usage in the circuit would make this a whole bunch easier.


Thanks for any help.
 
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