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Rodin coil question

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Njguy

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I am aware of toroid cored inductors and that they produce no magnetic field outside or in the center of the toroid. Apparently a Rodin coil does produce a magnetic filed in the center but not the outside. Just by looking at the geometry this appears plausible. I have read some claims that the center magnetic field in a rodin coil is actually stronger than the field generated in a normal cylindrical coil of similar dimensions, although I have my doubts. Just curious if anyone has any knowledge of this and if it is so.

p.s. I know this guy is mostly a crack pot but his coil is interesting.
 
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crutschow

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Most Helpful Member
Interesting, perhaps. But any claims about it generating energy are in the realm of perpetual motion or over-unity energy devices and are bogus. Large transformers and motors are already over 90% efficient so I don't see that it could much help in those applications.
 

Njguy

Member
Interesting, perhaps. But any claims about it generating energy are in the realm of perpetual motion or over-unity energy devices and are bogus. Large transformers and motors are already over 90% efficient so I don't see that it could much help in those applications.

I am thinking that you are right. Just wondering if you had an examples of a 90% efficient motor.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Just wondering if you had an examples of a 90% efficient motor.

A large multi hundred HP industrial motor with a synchronous rotor design would easily operate in the mid 90% efficiency range.

Small neodymium based BLDC motors can also get into the 90% efficiency ranges as well.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
there were cassette decks that had motors made by Robbins that were very efficient. as an experiment in braking force with one of these motors, i jumpered the power leads together and tried turning the shaft with a pair of pliers. either i wasn't able to get a good grip with the pliers or that shaft was super hard to turn (or maybe a bit of both). i know i couldn't turn it barehanded... and it was a small motor with a 1/8" dia spindle. without the jumper, the shaft would spin easily. the motor came out of a large data cassette drive that used standard c-30 cassettes to store data.
 
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