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Resistive Sender Information

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naseeam

Member
We have something called "Resistive Senders". There are two sensors connected to our Microprocessor based hardware platform. The sensors are Resistance Temperature Devices(RTDs) and Thermistor. RTD is used to measure motor temperature. Thermistor is used to measure temperature of some Generator or something.
Basically, Hardware and software work together to read sensor resistance and use Resistance/Temperature Tables to convert resistance to temperature to find out how hot or cold are motors and generators.

Besides understanding our Resistive Sender Design, I like to know if there are other designs out there. How can I start out with basic Resistive Sender information and move on to more advance stuff?
What does sender mean in Resistive Sender?

Thanks.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Resistive sender means nothing really just a complex word for a simple device. The unit is read like a simple resistor. Calibrating them is a little difficult because they're never linear over their temperature range. You basically feed the output into another resistor which forms a divider network and read the analog voltage produced.
 

naseeam

Member
>> Calibrating them is a little difficult because they're never linear over their temperature range.

What is Calibrating? Can you give a few examples as to why calibrating them is a little difficult because they are never linear over their temperature range.
 

weegee

New Member
Basically you build your circuit then measure the voltage received at known temperatures. Then you build a table with these voltage / temp pairs. When you need to know what temp the sensor is at, you read the voltage and compare it to the table. If the voltage falls between 2 entries in the table then you can interpolate the value. More known values in the table equals more accurate measurments. Provided your table has enough entries to represent the general curve of the sensor (which can be found in the datasheet) then you can say its calibrated.
 
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