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Read from Dallas DS5000T–32–16+

Boomerang

New Member
Hi !

Is there any way to copy the contents of this microcontroller?

Thanks in advance


Part Number: DS5000T–32–16+
RAM size: 32K bytes
MAx Crystal Speed: 16 MHz
TimeKeeping: Yes


8-Bit 8051-Compatible Microcontroller
Adapts to Task at Hand
8 or 32 kbytes of Nonvolatile RAM for
Program and/or Data Memory Storage
Initial Downloading of Software in End
System via On-Chip Serial Port
Capable of Modifying Its Own Program
and/or Data Memory in End Use

Crashproof Operation
Maintains All Nonvolatile Resources for 10
Years in the Absence of VCC at Room
Temperature
Power-Fail Reset
Early Warning Power-Fail Interrupt
Watchdog Timer

Software Security Feature
Executes Encrypted Software to Prevent
Unauthorized Disclosure

On-Chip, Full-Duplex Serial I/O Ports

Two On-Chip Timer/Event Counters

32 Parallel I/O Lines

Compatible with Industry Standard 8051
Instruction Set and Pinout

Optional Permanently Powered Real-Time
Clock (DS5000T)
 

Boomerang

New Member
So if Leave DS5000 Unlocked is checked during programming, the content can be copied and the same content can be programmed on another DS5000,
otherwise there is not even a theoretical possibility ?
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
So if Leave DS5000 Unlocked is checked during programming, the content can be copied and the same content can be programmed on another DS5000,
otherwise there is not even a theoretical possibility ?
You can, in theory, start a research project to decrypt the code or grind off the top of the chip to see how each bit of ROM is programmed so, it depends on your definition of "theoretically possible".
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
grind off the top of the chip to see how each bit of ROM is programmed
There is no ROM on the chip. It uses a watch battery and RAM to hold the instructions.
They are good for 10 years of sitting with out being used. Then the RAM starts to go away. If your parts are as old as the ones I have the program might be erased.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Only the ways I mentioned in post 5.
:rolleyes:
Post #5:
You can, in theory, start a research project to decrypt the code or grind off the top of the chip to see how each bit of ROM is programmed so, it depends on your definition of "theoretically possible".
Fuming nitric acid is another way to decap a chip and gain access to the contents, so that statement was not exactly exhaustive...
There's less chance of damage when using fuming NHO3 compared to using grinding/milling techniques, where there is a potential risk from swarf being dragged around/pushed down onto the die.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
:rolleyes:
Post #5:

Fuming nitric acid is another way to decap a chip and gain access to the contents, so that statement was not exactly exhaustive...
There's less chance of damage when using fuming NHO3 compared to using grinding/milling techniques, where there is a potential risk from swarf being dragged around/pushed down onto the die.
Not a technique for someone who, to identify the micro, had to post the marketing descrption.
 

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