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QA pass

granddad

Well-Known Member
OK lets say your the quality assurance guy in the Chinese factory , making soldering equipment. ! yes soldering equipment , would you pass this unit ....
joint.jpg.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
OK lets say your the quality assurance guy in the Chinese factory , making soldering equipment. ! yes soldering equipment , would you pass this unit ....
Yes of course!
Western guy just want cheap, quality cost money.

JimB
 

billybob

Active Member
Looks beautiful!
 

granddad

Well-Known Member
JimB .. 100+ GBP not that cheap ... ( I won't say what this part it is from as they have replaced the faulty unit )
 

ramondo

Member
At least you got the little white label, now you can tell them who to "reeducate".
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
So my partner is having a mid-life crisis and bought a Chrysler SRT6 sports car. Purchased sight-unseen from the middle of nowhere, with a 12 hour drive to get....just say "back" for now to avoid a complicated story. He had driven about ¾ a tank of gas, and the car sputtered to a stop in an intersection. Ok, new to him car, maybe the gas gage is inaccurate, so he called AAA. Adding a few gallons of gas didn't solve the problem.

He had done some research beforehand, and knew that a common fault was in one of the car control modules. Fortunately, there's nothing but relays in this module, one of while controls the fuel pump; cracked solder joints are a common fault. One theory is that a large connector isn't well supported, leading to cracks.

This happened in a small town, and he didn't have any tools. I could have walked him through fixing it if he could get a soldering iron and solder. But there was an easier solution at hand – a TV repair shop! He called them, and they said they'd be happy to resolder it. Fortunately, the module is easy to get out of the car.

The technician did a bangup job, problem solved and car runs great. But the technician said it wasn't a cracked joint. He believes this one connector had some foreign material on it when the module was assembled, and the pins were not properly soldered to start with. He was surprised it would have left the factory that way.

Only around 600 of these cars were built, and this failure is commonplace. Maybe the whole lot of connectors was improperly stored and somehow contaminated.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
OK lets say your the quality assurance guy in the Chinese factory , making soldering equipment. ! yes soldering equipment , would you pass this unit .....
I've seen MUCH worse and in, what are supposed to be, commercial products. Obviously (badly) hand soldered.

Mike.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I've seen MUCH worse and in, what are supposed to be, commercial products. Obviously (badly) hand soldered.
Going back to just after the war, there's a famous story about one of the radio manufacturers that sprang up - I can't remember which is was now?, might have been Ekco?.

Anyway, they were having problems with warranty faults - on a cyclic basis - every month a few days of production were far more unreliable than the rest.

An investigation showed that it was down to the woman who wound the coils - every month during her period the secretions from her hands altered, and this caused corrosion to occur on the coils. Providing her with gloves cured the problems.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
if it was here in the USA, and i were the inspector, no, i wouldn't pass it... unwetted wire, inclusions, bubbles, melted insulation ends, and one through joint looks like it has a ring in it....

yep, that's a NO-GO at this station....
 
Last edited:

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
An investigation showed that it was down to the woman who wound the coils - every month during her period the secretions from her hands altered, and this caused corrosion to occur on the coils. Providing her with gloves cured the problems.
Bizzare. I guess every ~28 days is a good clue.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Excellent picture to demonstrate what cold solder joints look like.
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
I assume RED is GND and black is VCC
 

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