Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Power Amplifier for Electrostatic Transducers

Status
Not open for further replies.

yeoshiki

New Member
Anyone has any experience with power amplifier design for electrostatic transducers?

I am using electrostatic transducers for transmitting ultrasound at between 40kHz to 80 kHz. However, these transducers requires high driving voltages around 100V peak and a bias voltage of 200V. I got a bias voltage from a DC-DC converter but am stuck with the power amplifier design. Basically it has to be high voltage and at the same time be able to match to the capacitive impedance of the transducer.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Use a low voltage power amp and send it through a transformer, you'd just have to ballance the secondary output, which you'll have to do anyways.
 

yeoshiki

New Member
Would any step-up transformer work? I thought you need to do the proper impedance matching at the output.


Use a low voltage power amp and send it through a transformer, you'd just have to ballance the secondary output, which you'll have to do anyways.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
So you create a matching network on the output...
 

mneary

New Member
I would be tempted to try a Pi network.

Do you know the impedance of the transducer? It's possibly expressed as a capacitance with a series resistance.
 

yeoshiki

New Member
Well the problem is the data sheet says nothing about its impedance. Its a Senscomp 600 series electrostatic transducer.

I guess the impedance matching shouldn't be that critical. At most I get less transmitted power. I don't think it would distort the signal in anyway.


I would be tempted to try a Pi network.

Do you know the impedance of the transducer? It's possibly expressed as a capacitance with a series resistance.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Actually at most you hurt your amplifier.
 

mneary

New Member
You could start with the 1kHz capacitance given of 400-500 pF, and initially ignore any resistive component. This will produce a matching network that may not optimize performance but could improve it.

Is this going to be broadband 40-80kHz or is it just that you haven't yet selected a frequency?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top