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Please ,what does this symbol mean ?

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House0Fwax

Member
That means an output socket, with the sheild connected to ground. Something like a phono socket or similar.

Oh, Nigel got there first.
 
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cobra148

Member
Wow !!!
Posted,and replied in minutes. I have loads of downloaded symbols pages from the
web,and the symbol wasn't on any of them.

I come across this symbol problem from time to time, (I am electronics beginner).
Thank you so much.
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It is only screened if it is connected to a screened cable
The metal case of the BNC is screening the mating connection, if the pcb mounted female part is grounded, which it should be.

So its a 50Ω or 75Ω screened connector when in use, screened cable or not.:)
 
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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
It is only screened if it is connected to a screened cable
As with every single screened connector that's made - if you fit non-screened cable then it's obviously pretty pointless having a screened connector in the first place.

But as far as BNC goes, unless you use exactly the correct screened cable, it's EXTREMELY difficult to fit a BNC connector.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Can I add one more description to this pi**ing contest?

It could represent a co-axial connector.

I use the word co-axial to represent an RF type cable rather than just a screened cable, which may be fine at audio frequencies but have excessive loss at RF.

As the circuit shown by the OP appears to be an amplifier for a low (RF) frequency loop antenna, I will stick with my description of co-ax connector as the output is intended to go to the input of a receiver which I guess will have a co-ax socket.

JimB
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Wow, I've seen some interesting arguments here (I know I've started some of em:rolleyes:) but this one takes the cake.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Can I add one more description to this pi**ing contest?

It could represent a co-axial connector.

I use the word co-axial to represent an RF type cable rather than just a screened cable, which may be fine at audio frequencies but have excessive loss at RF.

As the circuit shown by the OP appears to be an amplifier for a low (RF) frequency loop antenna, I will stick with my description of co-ax connector as the output is intended to go to the input of a receiver which I guess will have a co-ax socket.
Both BNC and Phono sockets are coaxial as well, presumably you're referring to a Belling-Lee connector?. Certainly the fact it hints at been a coaxial connector is why I mentioned it might be a screened socket.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Both BNC and Phono sockets are coaxial as well, presumably you're referring to a Belling-Lee connector?. Certainly the fact it hints at been a coaxial connector is why I mentioned it might be a screened socket.
Exactly.

As the pack had suggested a variety of specific socket types, just for the fun of it I thought I would try and drag it back into a more generic area.

Incidentally, he phono plug/socket is considered to be quite a good socket for RF use, I have seen it used for making connections between modules at 160Mhz (ish) inside commercial radio equipment.

JimB
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Incidentally, he phono plug/socket is considered to be quite a good socket for RF use, I have seen it used for making connections between modules at 160Mhz (ish) inside commercial radio equipment.
It's often used inside TV's for the UHF tuner aerial input, up to 850MHz.
 
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