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PICkit 4

Jon Wilder

Active Member
Anyone else here using the PICkit 4? I've been using PK3 for the last few years and just grabbed a PK4. Thing is way faster than the PK3. Gotta say I love it.

For those who are still on MPLAB 8, it's only compatible with MPLAB X. But they've really come a long way with MPLAB X, and have even added compatibility with AVR devices. The PK4 will also program Atmel devices as well.

I haven't tried it on the Atmel stuff but I'm sure it will work just as well with them.
 

Les Jones

Well-Known Member
I have just started using one and have only tried it with a PIC16F18446. In the past I have used a pickit2 and pickit3 (After first using parallel port programmers.) I liked the easy to use programming software as I used text editor (Programmers file editor.) and MPASM to assemble the code. so the main learning curve was with MPLABX. I find it very very slow compared with just using the text editor and MPASM. The debugging feature of MPLABX is useful. Other than problems I had understanding the way MPLABX works the PICkit4 has worked without a problem.

Les.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Previous was PicStart Plus with MPLAB 8.92.

Started to use it some 30 days ago, jointly with my first MPLABX (ver 5.25) and a new (for me) micro 18F2321.

Evrything run smoothly after I learnt the basics of the clerical part to start a project afresh. I simplified my life bringing everithing to D:/

PICkit4, flawless.

1577578215559.png
 
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DrG

Active Member
Glad to hear it and I'm hoping to have a similar report. I bought the PICKit 4 from Microchip a while ago (on sale). Have not yet retired the PICKit 3 (clone? I never know). They improved the way MPLABX IDE handles the 3. Now, it downloads the code before it burns and it has improved performance and the frequency of those WTF? moments.

Have only heard good things about the 4, so I figured, why not....you want to play with Microchip, then play by their rules...also, I want to be able to program any chip that they make...at least theoretically.
 

Jon Wilder

Active Member
I have just started using one and have only tried it with a PIC16F18446. In the past I have used a pickit2 and pickit3 (After first using parallel port programmers.) I liked the easy to use programming software as I used text editor (Programmers file editor.) and MPASM to assemble the code. so the main learning curve was with MPLABX. I find it very very slow compared with just using the text editor and MPASM. The debugging feature of MPLABX is useful. Other than problems I had understanding the way MPLABX works the PICkit4 has worked without a problem.

Les.
That was how I started back in 2010 with a 16F628A, but with a kit programmer that used a parallel port on the PC and the ICSP interface on the target. I would have to remove the PIC from the target board and place it in the programmer for each code change. I typically used Vim text editor, then MPASM assembler to build. I had tried to wrap my brain around MPLAB IDE, but at the time I was very new to embedded electronics so it was a bit advanced for me at the time.

Once I transitioned to the 16F88x family, I bought a PICkit 2. I got back into playing with MPLAB IDE and got quite good with it. Once I had the PICkit 2, the convenience of editing code, then clicking the "Build & Load" button sped up my debug time immensely. I especially loved the in circuit debugger functions. Needless to say, I ditched the old kit programmer.

Then the MPLAB X beta was released. It was way cool at first and I loved the user interface, but very buggy. Once I realized the ICD didn't work very well, I went right back to MPLAB 8.92.

A couple of years later, after X had been out for some time, I decided to give it another go. It had improved immensely, and ICD was now fully functional. From this point on, I used X exclusively and never looked back.

When I transitioned to the 18F family, I bought the PICkit 3. I messed with the 18F4620, 18F4550, and the 18F4555 before I found the 18Fx6K22 family, which I have been using pretty much exclusively. I recently learned of some new 18F devices that I plan to try out.

Microchip Assembly was my first programming language, followed by Intel Assembly with the MCS-51 family. Eventually I started playing around with C here and there, then went into C full time. I was using the Hitech C Compiler until XC8 was released, which I really liked as it featured support for both Hitech PICC and C18 syntax.

In 2015, I got into AVR devices using Atmel Studio and the AVR Dragon programmer. Once I learned that X and PK4 now support AVR devices, I wanted to give those a go. So I got the PK4.

I would love to see AT89S device support with the PK4. Maybe they'll add that in a future firmware release.

I have to say I really love the direction Microchip has gone over the years, especially since they acquired Atmel. I wasn't sure how that was going to turn out but in the end, they've come a long way since I started with PIC in 2010.
 
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atferrari

Well-Known Member
Lot of new chips have shown up in those 9 years.
 

Jon Wilder

Active Member
Lot of new chips have shown up in those 9 years.
I know...hence the reason I originally got the PK3. I was wanting to use the 18Fx6K22 family, but they're not supported by PK2.

Now there are even newer devices which are only supported by PK4, hence why I got the PK4 now.
 

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