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New terms

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large_ghostman

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In the UK as it stands you dont retain copy write if you agree to the new terms, they are in the states so have been checking with a lawyer there, seems despite the claims we keep copywrite that dont hold up with the wording at the start.

Now for some like me that has serious implications for work etc. It also implies if we sign new terms then the old ones are not in force. They may add them obviously, but if you havnt specifically agreed then the old terms do not apply, in which case you have various other rights. I will post the full email when i get clarification from an American lawyer

LG
 

large_ghostman

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Hi little ghost will be logging in, however note that come the 25th of may new rules apply to how you use my data, i am also entitled by law for a completelist of who it goes to and how its used, because you make me use my name etc you are under the new regs. I had hoped an admin would have replied, so take note, on the 25th your office will be served with a notice, under international law you have 10 days to respond to it.

I suggest anyone else who wants to know where there data goes and for how much just simply ask one the admin. Even if your in the states, if the company has EU clients then the law applies. This is the result of the recent facebook thing.

If ETO want my American attorney details just contact me. or wait until after the 25th.

Oh and for the record i revoke all license rights to little ghost account, the ticking to agree is simply because there is no way to contact admin and get a reply without doing so.
 

gophert

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Hi little ghost will be logging in, however note that come the 25th of may new rules apply to how you use my data, i am also entitled by law for a completelist of who it goes to and how its used, because you make me use my name etc you are under the new regs. I had hoped an admin would have replied, so take note, on the 25th your office will be served with a notice, under international law you have 10 days to respond to it.

I suggest anyone else who wants to know where there data goes and for how much just simply ask one the admin. Even if your in the states, if the company has EU clients then the law applies. This is the result of the recent facebook thing.

If ETO want my American attorney details just contact me. or wait until after the 25th.

Oh and for the record i revoke all license rights to little ghost account, the ticking to agree is simply because there is no way to contact admin and get a reply without doing so.
Contracts apply to individuals, not to each individual online account or persona. ETO can claim YOU clicked "agree".
 

large_ghostman

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Contracts apply to individuals, not to each individual online account or persona. ETO can claim YOU clicked "agree".
Nothing is being claimed at the moment, no one from the company has had the decency to contact me yet or reply to my email. All i asked for was the attorney address or contact details so i could clear something up. I can only act on the legal advice i have been given.
 

gophert

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large_ghostman

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Hard to track down the owners when they hide behind godaddy.com privacy umbrellas.

https://www.whois.com/whois/electro-tech-online.com
Actually its WTWH medias attorney details i need. Fortunately by law a company must declare ownership of a site and its contact details, Hence why they are on the Bottom.

Although how long has it taken them to comply with the cookie law?
 

large_ghostman

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Icant say too much but its on several issues. Those of here who were once paying forum supporters, apparently have full contractual rights. The other big issue is come the 25th this comes into effect

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b311mb

That is the short BBC version that explains some the new privacy rights etc. Next week there is a longer full edition. Because i run several sites I got bombed with loads of compliance info on this. One is a photography site, copywrite is obviously a big thing with pictures so we had to really look into it. Watch the i player thing above.

Now two things are likely to get thrown at me, one will be the fact its an American company and the second its on an American server, if you watch that and read the info on it (look it up). That dosnt matter, i have most of my sites on America servers and i have an American registered company, even though the new law is a EU law it affects ANY country with EU customers.

I have had this confirmed via my own American attorney, this means we have a great deal more rights over our content, it also means despite what the new terms say, come the 25th it wont matter, they still have to comply. I had wanted to get it sorted lawyer to lawyer but no one bothered to contact me.

I will let know what happens, but any members that supported the forum with cash via the old forum supporter thing we had, you would be surprised to hear what the Attorney has had to say on the new terms..

From the 25th you have full control on your data, ad despite the wording on the terms you can revoke it, in fact after the 25th having your posts altered for anything but getting rid of illegal material needs your prior consent.

Now yes we could get punished for this, but equally the rules have taken this into account. If your banned then you have the right to have your entire data and postings deleted.

Am i pleased about this? no not really, running some sites myself thic has/is causing big headaches, the new law was rushed in because of facebook, what is worse i there is more rules to follow from the American side of the pond also, but not until early next year i think.

Breach of the rules could get an entire site taken offline throughout Europe and court action.

What isnt clear to me is how they would actually do this, there is also a strict time scale from when you ask to have something done and the time they have to do it.

Now as i said i have a photography site on a American server, that dont give me any protection as a site owner, photography is notorious for copywrite problems, so the things creeping out the wood work are incredible.

Its likely i will give up that site, complying with the new rules would just be too much trouble for what its worth.

The cheapest way to sort this would have been for the company here to contact me, then our attorneys could have worked together as we share the same interests at the end of the day, the other course of action cost more but might be quicker (dosnt cost me more).

Those of you with forums and sites, get upto speed on ALL aspects of the new law, its got alot more teeth than it first seems
 
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rjenkinsgb

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I believe you are getting a bit OTT with this;

You certainly have a right for your details as held in your personal account settings to be controlled and deleted - but voluntary publications of articles on sites such as this are a very different matter.

Although the GDPR definitions of personal data are rather fuzzy, it does contain clauses such as this:

----------
The GDPR specifically says that further processing for the following purposes should be considered to be compatible lawful processing operations:
  • archiving purposes in the public interest;
  • scientific research purposes; and
  • statistical purposes.
----------

Deleting one users posts could destroy the sense of the whole thread and damage other peoples contributions. Keeping threads intact is "public interest" - and on a technical forum such as this also often for scientific research.


I do not believe anyone knowingly making public postings on public web boards / forums etc., where they know that they can be read by anyone, can consider such posts personal or confidential.
[Apparently private material, such as personal messages, are a different thing - but not public in the first place so deletion is no detriment to other users in general].

There is no obligation for anyone to join or post anything & you can use a nickname or handle so no other user has to know any of your personal info at all.
That personal info access is restricted the account owner and the site owners/managers, who are regulated by privacy law.

[Edit - corrected to "Deleting one users posts ..."]
 
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Nigel Goodwin

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I believe you are getting a bit OTT with this;
He certainly is :D

I would suggest he might like to log off and not bother coming back here, or any other forum, or anything else on-line if he's so paranoid.

Although the GDPR definitions of personal data are rather fuzzy:
It's a typical 'knee jerk' reaction from the authorities, passing legislation with no idea whatsoever of what they are doing, or even why.
 

large_ghostman

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I would suggest he might like to log off and not bother coming back here, or any other forum, or anything else on-line if he's so paranoid.
Interesting response Nigel
 

large_ghostman

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more than one way to shake apples from a tree, besides you are entitled to your opinion, more so being a mod and a well respected one at that......obviously
 

rjenkinsgb

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Going back to the first part of this thread, re copyright (not copywrite - copywriting is a totally different thing).

It is impossible to publish any item on an internet site where it can be freely read or viewed by others and retain total copyright control of that item.
That's why all web sites where you can upload or post material for other users to see have T&Cs that mention something about granting shared copyright in some way or other [or they should have such terms].


Think about it - when someone looks at anything on a web site, their web browser downloads a copy of the material from the server to the users PC so it can be rendered on screen.
By the act of posting material in a public-viewable form, you are by default voluntarily giving up some control and granting some rights to the site you post it on. Without those rights the site could not store or display the material.

Anyone with any technical savvy also knows that any material posted online will fairly quickly be replicated and cached on internet archiving systems and by search engines etc., meaning countless copies stored all over the world.

You still own copyright, but once you make it publicly available your control is limited to possibly such as requiring attribution and restricting commercial use, if that.

The only way to retain absolute and total copyright control is not post the copyright material to any public site at all, ever.


No one is forced to post any material online to public sites, so any consequential grant of copyright to a web site is a totally voluntary act.
 
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large_ghostman

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Going back to the first part of this thread, re copyright (not copywrite - copywriting is a totally different thing).

It is impossible to publish any item on an internet site where it can be freely read or viewed by others and retain total copyright control of that item.
That's why all web sites where you can upload or post material for other users to see have T&Cs that mention something about granting shared copyright in some way or other [or they should have such terms].


Think about it - when someone looks at anything on a web site, their web browser downloads a copy of the material from the server to the users PC so it can be rendered on screen.
By the act of posting material in a public-viewable form, you are by default voluntarily giving up some control and granting some rights to the site you post it on. Without those rights the site could not store or display the material.

Anyone with any technical savvy also knows that any material posted online will fairly quickly be replicated and cached on internet archiving systems and by search engines etc., meaning countless copies stored all over the world.

You still own copyright, but once you make it publicly available your control is limited to possibly such as requiring attribution and restricting commercial use, if that.

The only way to retain absolute and total copyright control is not post the copyright material to any public site at all, ever.


No one is forced to post any material online to public sites, so any consequential grant of copyright to a web site is a totally voluntary act.
there is alot more to this than any of that, not being funny but your user date makes it impossible for any of it to apply to you. Having paid for two lots of legal advice i think i ought to listen to them TBH.
 
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