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motor controller from treadmill

bubblehead1

New Member
I have a motor and the controller from a treadmill that I would like to use on a project. When I first got it the motor worked but after letting it sit collecting dust for awhile now nothing. I have not been able to find a schematic for the control and was wondering if someone could help me out with that. If I had that I think I can find what is wrong and repair it. The control was made by GE and the number on the board is 44A962492-001 R00. Thank you all for any help here.
Bruce
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Test the motor on a an automotive battery, it should spin quite freely.
If an odd ball model, the details of the board may be a problem to find.
Some are 5k pot control, others are via a PWM signal input.
 

bubblehead1

New Member
The motor has a wound field as well as a wound armature and is 2hp 90 volts. 4 wires going in, two for the field and two for the armature. I can hook up a DC source to it but how much do I need to supply to the field and how much to the armature. Don't want to burn it up. When I had the controller hooked up to it the voltage was next to nothing suppling the motor. There are a couple of resistors that get warmer than they should with no load so I am suspecting a problem with the board. The pot has no value printed on it but measures 8K. Thank you
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
The absence of large electrolytic cap would indicate it is not PWM and possibly SCR.
Can you see the device numbers of the heatsink ?
If the motor is a shunt (parallel) field then you could supply both from one 12v battery source.
shunt wound motors have not been around for some time, and normally there is a field loss detection, due to if the motor could experience run-away and possible destruction if the field is lost.
The most common one now is the series field motor, for the non-PM kind.
The ideal is to know what control input type it is and it can be tested on the bench with the motor for e.g.
.
 

bubblehead1

New Member
Thank you MaxHeadRoom. Should I just call you Max? Anyway, been without my computer for two or three hours. Phone was down. The number on the heatsink is, I'll just give you all of them, IC3645TMRM1A and then there is KK6201T R04 VJ. Not sure what all that means but maybe you can explain it to me.
Bruce
 

bubblehead1

New Member
The IC3645TMRM1A number is larger than the others and they are all on a sticker on the heatsink. I think that is the number you probably want. That 44A962492-001 is the GE part number. GE is who made the control.
 

bubblehead1

New Member
After doing some more reading I found out that the motor is called a shunt wound motor. I hooked it up to a 24v supply and it runs just fine so the problem is in the controller. Printed circuits are kind of hard to follow but I am going to try. I doubt that I will be able to draw a schematic though. I checked for voltage at the connection going to the motor and there was nothing. Didn't matter where the pot was set. I should look to see if I could just buy a speed control that would work that would not be too expensive.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
After doing some more reading I found out that the motor is called a shunt wound motor.
As per my post #5.

I hooked it up to a 24v supply and it runs just fine so the problem is in the controller.
Sounds as if you need both a 24v field supply and a 90vdc for the armature.
Probabally won't find much on line for it, would have to be custom.
If you need bi-directional control, you could swap either the field or the armature to reverse.
PWM armature control will give the smoothest results.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
That is a better pic that seems to show a bridge rectifier and a TDA1085 which is a Motorola IC that was developed to control a Universal motor for washing machine use.
The TDA1085 controlled a Triac. (T1?)
It also has a low-res digital input for a simple tach.
The board does not appear to have inputs for the field so it could be a universal (series field?) motor

example circuit.
1619368773396.png
 
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bubblehead1

New Member
MaxHeadRoom78 Thanks for the schematic. Question, is the speed of the motor controlled by the voltage on the armature while the field voltage stays constant? Through all this I am learning more and more about motors. It is interesting. Most of what I knew before was you plugged them in turned them on and didn't even think about what all was going on and knew very little about DC motors.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Check to see if it is in fact a Universal (AC/DC) motor, the field in series with the armature, it also should have the tach, which is paramount using a Universal motor for T.M. operation.
Terminals TA1 & TA2 = tach?
How are you sure it was not used in a series fashion?
Also if that is a Triac on the H.S., then it again points to being a Universal motor..
I remember about 30+ yrs ago when Honeywell developed this IC for W.M. use for these motors.
 

bubblehead1

New Member
There are 4 wires plus a ground going to the motor. The info on the motor tag is ---DC motor type BD6219 059142/092836 (don't know what these numbers are for) Volts 120 A. 6.2 K94 Hp 2 MW XJB (don't know what these are for either but they were on the tag) Cust pt 5P80GY3 I will google some of this stuff and see what I can learn.
 

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