Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Monostable and Astable multivibrator circuit using CMOS gates

Status
Not open for further replies.

olgaPB

New Member
:confused: PLEASE somebody help me!
I have to design a monostable and a astable multivibrator circuit using cmos gates and simultate it in pspice I have been trying everything but I can't get a signal the output for the monostable has to produce 10 micro second pulses and the astable with oscilation frequency of 1KHz.

Thanks
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There are lots of ways to make a monostable pulse.

Cmos oscillators are simple. Use gates intead of inverters if you want.
 

Attachments

  • Cmos Oscillators.PNG
    Cmos Oscillators.PNG
    16.3 KB · Views: 4,341

mneary

New Member
You need to review the textbook section that discusses multivibrators. Or you can Google to find alternate explanations. Maybe someone who attended the same lecture can supply some insight.

Wikipedia has a nice discussion; just use your cmos gates instead of transistors.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
deroshan said:
Could you please tell me how to design a single stage amplifier using BJT for a given gain?
This thread talks about Cmos pulse generators and oscillators, not BJT transistors. You should have started your own thread.

The voltage gain of a common-emitter transistor that doesn't have feedback from its collector to its base is simply the collector resistor (and anything in parallel with it) divided by the unbypassed emitter resistance.
Of course the input of the transistor must have a properly calculated DC bias voltage.

So a transistor wirh a 12k collector resistor, a 62k load and a 1k emitter resistor has a voltage gain of 10.
If the emitter resistor is bypassed then the voltage gain is about 180 with high distortion at high levels.
 

deroshan

New Member
Thank you...

audioguru said:
This thread talks about Cmos pulse generators and oscillators, not BJT transistors. You should have started your own thread.

The voltage gain of a common-emitter transistor that doesn't have feedback from its collector to its base is simply the collector resistor (and anything in parallel with it) divided by the unbypassed emitter resistance.
Of course the input of the transistor must have a properly calculated DC bias voltage.

So a transistor wirh a 12k collector resistor, a 62k load and a 1k emitter resistor has a voltage gain of 10.
If the emitter resistor is bypassed then the voltage gain is about 180 with high distortion at high levels.

Hi thank you :)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

Top