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last time I use a perfboard with only pads

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
assembling a project on a perfboard I purchased really cheap but it has no rails for Vdd or GRD. top layer has only holes, no markers. Bottom only has little square pads.
trying to track down circuit issues is a pain.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
assembling a project on a perfboard I purchased really cheap but it has no rails for Vdd or GRD. top layer has only holes, no markers. Bottom only has little square pads.
trying to track down circuit issues is a pain.
I prefer the strip boards. Then a hand-held 3/16th inch drill bit spun in a hole to break a strip into a segment. So fast and safe vs razor blade to cut strips.
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
I use cheap perf-board from eBay all the time. I got some big pieces to build an LED array, I needed 2 but got a pack of 5 since it only cost a bit more. Build, modify and dismantle circuits a few times and some of the pads come off, but it doesn't matter they are only for anchoring anyway. Because it's flimsy it's easy to enlarge holes or make new ones with a square awl. Combine with similarly cheap 0.1mm magnet wire for the connects where component leads won't reach. Use bare wire pulled from old phone cable to make power rails, just tack it down every so many pads. Some bits of hook-up wire do for the longer connections.

The double sided sort is even more versatile.

Bend alternate legs up on a SOP and you can solder the rest to pads. SOT can go at a funky angle, SSOP requires kapton (or "koptan" in my case) tape to help, however.

Cut up it makes handy pieces to make little sub-assemblies.

If I'm stuck for where I am on the board I just push a thick piece of wire through so I can see the hole I want.

I'd quite like to try the square-pad sort, would make it very easy to solder SMDs to.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I second Vero (strip) Board, half way down the page https://www.futurlec.com/Protoboards.shtml
Max.
Yeah, great stuff Veroboard - but don't use a twist drill (as gophert suggested), buy the proper cutter for it - it makes live SO much easier.

I used a twist drill for years (I'm tight with my cash!), but after I bought the proper tool I wished I'd done it years before.
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
Agreed. Twist drill hurts your fingers!
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Agreed. Twist drill hurts your fingers!
I Use an antique pin vise for the bit. I was using a tap handle but the pin vise is much easier. I recommend the vero tool if you are buying something for the task because fat pin vises are spendy.
 
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granddad

Well-Known Member
This is my first go at single sided matrix board , previously always Vero strip board , or similar, the PIC24FJ1024GA606 ( 64 pin ) is on a breakout , so this would be impossible with a strip layout. The back of the board is quite a rats nest !

Maxbd.jpg
 

Les Jones

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A few months ago I found A pack of assorted size prototype boards on ebay at a very low price. I prefer vero type strip board but these cheap ones are OK for simple projects. This is an example. (A board to read a BME280 sensor to be read remotely via an HC-12 module. It uses a pic12f1840.)
IMG_1738.JPG
IMG_1739.JPG
Les.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
This is an example. (A board to read a BME280 sensor to be read remotely via an HC-12 module. It uses a pic12f1840.)
Nice - however, you might like to look at the 16F18313 (my new 8 pin of choice) as a replacement for the 12F1840 (which used to be my 8 pin of choice), as it's one of the new enhanced range with the nice new facilities.

I've recently been building some remote controls using the 16F18313 and the same HC-12 as you, I only wanted ON and OFF so enough pins on the 8 pin device.
 

Les Jones

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Nigel,
I've just had a look at the data sheet for the PIC16F18313 and noticed it has only half the program memory of the pIC12F1840. For most things I have used the pIC12F1840 for that would not matter but the code to read BME280 sensor and do all the calculations required took me onto the second page of program memory.. I have put the basic maths code and text messages on the second memory page. Thanks for the tip I will order some next time I have an order big enough to qualify for free postage from Farnell.

Les.
 

granddad

Well-Known Member
After starting my project ( above ) I did find some interesting boards ( ElectroCookie EU_Snappable 3.8" x 3.5" X0014W6TM9 ) . Blue or black
on amazon . think 3 for 13 GBP bit like the Tripad board , but has power rails . ( can be snapped into 4 at 1.7" x 1.9" ) Could do with row and column markings .

cookbd.jpg
 
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