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Is this sort of solenoid? Found this from laser printer

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fezder

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There is hole for shaft (which I also salvaged, such shafts are pricey)
I could of course just hook power and see how it smokes, but figured to ask before I do it....
Also, that gear more indifferently from shaft-portion.
IMG_1371.jpg
 

spec

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There is hole for shaft (which I also salvaged, such shafts are pricey)
I could of course just hook power and see how it smokes, but figured to ask before I do it....
Also, that gear more indifferently from shaft-portion.
View attachment 99941
Hy fezder,

That looks like a clutch as it says on the label, as you would have in your automobile. It will work in one of two ways:
(1) When it is not energized there will be a mechanical coupling between the input gear say, and output brass. When you put 23V DC (24V) across the terminals the clutch will disengage and there will be no mechanical coupling between the input and output.
(2) Or the reverse

Yes, the clutch is operated by a solenoid.

spec
 
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fezder

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fezder

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Guys, I tested it now and indeed, when voltage is applied (worked with 15 volts just ok, I don't have 24ish volts PSU) gear is attached to axle hub, but sluggish like "loose" stepper. Thankee!
 

cowboybob

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This is a SWAG, but probably involved in paper handling, i.e., like during the paper take-up sequence.
 

fezder

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Hmm, good point. Didn't look where these were located. Now just to think possible good aaplications, I noted that voltage is proportional for how well gear grips to hub, which makes sense, so it could also be used as linear-clutch, instead of on/off clutch.
 

cowboybob

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noted that voltage is proportional for how well gear grips to hub, which makes sense, so it could also be used as linear-clutch, instead of on/off clutch.
Could be for intentional slippage (to reduce the paper "damage" or extent from jams and thus make clearing them easier...?!).
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Reading, or in interpreting the Patent description, it appears that input and output shaft are separated until the coil is energised, whereupon this results in winding the spring up after which the secondary shaft turns.
At least that is what I get from the write up.
This would also imply it is uni-directional.
Much could be confirmed by powering up and testing!
Max.
 

fezder

Well-Known Member
Reading, or in interpreting the Patent description, it appears that input and output shaft are separated until the coil is energised, whereupon this results in winding the spring up after which the secondary shaft turns.
Yes, this is what it does.
I didn't test whether polarity matters, but I suppose it doesn't effect anything since even relays work either way...
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Correct, usually polarity does not matter unless a motorized device OR a magnetic latching solenoid, then polarity matters.
Max.
 

fezder

Well-Known Member
magnetic latching solenoid,
Care to tell more? I think I saw those too in laser printers, there was magnet that latched sort of hinged metal piece to "lock" gear in place, is this such things? Of course I could test this too...
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Yes a latching relay and/or solenoid has a P.M. on the energised side. but it does not have enough strength to pull the armature over, or in,
Provide the right polarity and once shifted it stays latched via the P.M., even when powered off.
To release it, an opposite polarity through the coil, negates the P.M. and it returns to its off position.
The advantage is, it has memory, IOW status remains whether power is present or not.
Max.
 

fezder

Well-Known Member
Thanks. Had to check what those acronyms meant;
P.M=permanent magnet
IOW=(guess) in other words?
Hmm, back in school I think we used latching relays but cant recall did they have memory or not. Teachers called them "flip flop relays" and "step relays" as well as "pulse relays"
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Step relays often took many forms, such as step indexers used in early phone exchanges etc.
A latching relay is a little vague, as you can latch a normal relay by contact closure, but it does not necessarily retain the state on power off.
Where a P.M. solenoid/relay does.
Acronyms are correct.
Max.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
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Correct, usually polarity does not matter unless a motorized device OR a magnetic latching solenoid, then polarity matters.
Max.
It matters somewhat in a clutch used for tensioning. You generally want to go negative a bit to counter-act the residual magnetism if you want close to zero. I built a tensioning controller and didn't do that, but it turned out we didn't need it anyway.
 
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