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IR receiver - 3 pins - "BG" on the back - datasheet required

atferrari

Well-Known Member
I bought this IR receiver (is it?) many many years ago. Always believed I had the datasheet but no. Not even sure if it is for 38 KHz.

No other marking than the "BG" in the back.

I could try to identify +V and GND pins with a DMM but I would prefer not to risk damaging it.

A Google search did not give any meaningful result.

Help will be appreciated.

Back.pngFront.png
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
They are usually pretty standard connections (and the frequency seems to make sod all difference - we only ever kept one type for service replacements).

This one looks pretty easy - the metal screen is connected to the middle pin, so obviously ground. So only two options, I suggest you try the one below.

ir.png
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Yes the middle is soldered to the screen.
Gracias Nigel.
 

DrG

Active Member
You may want to check out the little testing circuit in this article (note also the different pin outs with GND on pin 2).
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
For eventual future reference.

The guy that sold them to me on the counter, did not hesitate: IRM 8601 M2

Tested today successfully.

20191231_153325.jpg
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Nice scope. Why haven't you taken the cellophane off? :)
Owon SmartDS7102V.

I still ask myself that question. Not that I am trying to sell it...! :eek:

Now that I think of it, with several instruments I spent long time with the protecting cover on. Maniac...?
 

DrG

Active Member
Owon SmartDS7102V.

I still ask myself that question. Not that I am trying to sell it...! :eek:

Now that I think of it, with several instruments I spent long time with the protecting cover on. Maniac...?
Fear of commitment. ;)
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Got to admit to doing the same with the factory screen protection, for as long as possible.
The way I see it, you get to wipe the crud off the protective film for a while, then when it gets dulled you take it off and a brand new screen is revealed.
If you take it off from the get go, you leave the screen open to 'wear and tear' right away.
I have a 3D printer LCD screen with the factory protection still on, after 3 years. It's had general dust build-up, woodworking dust build-up and hairspray spatter on it, but it's perfectly legible through the protective film, after being wiped off.
Why should I remove it right away?
 

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