Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

IoT Webser using Arduino

Hi Folks,
just completed a course on creating a webserver using an Arduino Uno which allows for remotely monitoring and controlling actuators. This also includes visualizing the sensor data on really cool looking animated dials... Based on what I've learned (and I really learned a lot), I wanted to know if there were any industrial versions of the Arduino Uno or Mega that I could use for my next automated project. The Uno was fine for my learning purposes, but I'm now ready to start building something a little more robust which will need more memory and GPIO's... In case anyone is interested, the course I'm referring to is "IoT Web Server Dashboard On-Line Course"
Any help in finding a more industrial type of device would be greatly appreciated.
 

danadak

Active Member
The ESP32 good idea but one problem is that they have lousy A/Ds.

One can use a 2 chip solution, the ESP8266 or ESP32 to do the server, and a
better chip to do the analog. Here is an example of whats on a PSOC that would
allow you expanded I/O as well as robust data acquisition, including filtering if
you needed it. One chip, in below multiple copies of many of the resources
shown. Drag and drop tool, rich API library to manage, and routability onchip.
Like having a proto board with a bucket of parts and wires, all in one chip.

Then hand off to the ESP part to handle web server portion.

1657622781515.png


Here is an example project using one to create an oscilloscope :


A bursting f() generator example :



Regards, Dana.
 
Last edited:

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My go-to device would be a DSPIC33 series.

You can very easily use shift register ICs as fast input and output expanders, working from an SPI port with a couple of other pins driving the input load & output latch signals to the shift registers.

Or even use CAN BUS for separated modules; some PICs have CAN built in.



Note that you can equally well use shift registers as expanders on an Arduino, or just about any device with SPI.

An article on using shift registers as I/O expanders with an arduino:


There are also I2C expanders such as the MCP23017, which adds 16 configurable input or output pins per IC, and you can use up to eight of those on the same I2C bus, just using two MCU pins 64 I/O

Not as fast as shift registers, but very usable, and there are Arduino libraries to make them easy to use:
 

danadak

Active Member
How much I/O do you need ? Many low costs solution can get you in the
'area of 70 pins ? One example, a 64 bit SR in 1 chip, and tons of resources left
for other uses, analog as well as digital -

https:/e/www.electro-tech-online.com/articles/64-bit-serial-in-parallel-out-shift-register.939/

Are you driving a lot of current with the I/O ?


Regards, Dana.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Any help in finding a more industrial type of device would be greatly appreciated.

To clarify, "industrial" devices generally use conventional ICs and components, but with separate switching transistors or relays to control (usually) 24V signals.

Likewise, inputs would have voltage dividers and capacitive filtering to reduce the 24 volts used at the inputs down to the 5V or 3.3V range accepted by the ICs.

This is a typical industrial controller, with 24V inputs and outputs built in, plus networking and web server.

They can be expanded with extra I/O modules stacked to the side, to 24V switching inputs and outputs, or analog I/O and many other types of module. They can also exchange I/O data between controllers over the network links.

This is a module to add16 input and 16 outputs; several can be stacked.

There are many makes, that's just a type we use regularly so I'm familiar with them.
 
Thank you all for the feedback and pointers.
Dana: I'm going to need about 8 analog I/O's and 6 digital I/O's for my next project.
rjenkinsgb: I looked at the Siemens option and I can see why one would use this kind of device for mission critical application, I guess I was a little misleading when I used the term industrial, but 400-500$ is somewhat out of my budget for what I want to do.


I looked at the Arduino Mega and I think it will meet my needs, I will need to get one and test it first. I was hoping to get one that has the SD card and Ethernet jack built in to avoid using shields, but the only manufacturer I could find that had one as now discontinued it... MEGA 2560 ETH, R3, with PoE, ATmega2560+W5500, Micro-SD card reader.

Thanks for all your responses..

Cam

 

danadak

Active Member
This has the capability in many designs of being a single chip solution -

1657723412328.png


Above is a catalog of whats onchip. Many multiple copies. Its routable, has a rich API library to
manage each of the components (in PSOC land a component is an onchip resource).

$15 board excellent buy and utility.

1657723581851.png



IDE (PSOC Creator) and Compiler free.

100's of example projects, ability to create custom components via schematic capture and/or use of Verilog.

With onboard configurable muxes trivial to have 8 analog channels as well as differential, mated
with SAR or 20 bit DelSig. Also onboard precision Vref.


Regards, Dana.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I was hoping to get one that has the SD card and Ethernet jack built in
ATmega328P with Ethernet, current product and in stock:


Seeed make a lot of Arduino equivalent boards, just branded Seeduino.

Note that the Siemens plc I mentioned was purely an example of an industrial controller, I was not suggesting you use it!

The previous post about low cost I/O expanders was the stuff I thought you may be able to use.


And of course you could design your own circuit board, to have all the features you need - it's quite easy and does not cost much, often cheaper than buying modules such as arduinos for things that can be done with a small MCU.

Plus the resulting design is then your property!
 

tepalia02

Member
Unfortunately, cannot really suggest any industrial substitute/ version of Arduino UNO. There was a product named The Arduino Industrial 101. It was a WiFi board based on a MIPS Linux processor. But I can see that it has been retired.
 

Latest threads

Top