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I2C Constant Current LED Driver - 16 or more Bits

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JonSea

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I'm striking out in my searching, so let me ask here.

I'm looking for a 16 or 32 bit constant current driver with an I2C interface...in an SOIC package. The drivers I have found are in fine-pitched packages, like TSSOP and others with similar pitches. Yes, I can solder those packages... I just don't want to!
 

JonSea

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Like I said, I'm looking for an I2C interface. Thanks though.
 

JonSea

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Thank you! I had missed that one in my search. Digikey and Mouser both have good stock in the SO24 package.
 

JonSea

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Actually, I remember now I had looked at the PCA9532. It's not constant current, so each LED needs a series resistor.

My choice is between constant current shift registers and I2C with the addition of resistors. Everything else is I2C so it's kind of a toss up at this point which way I'll go.
 

Pommie

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Have you considered using a μC to convert I2C to serial and use a Max7219 to control 64 LEDs? The 16F18323 has 2 serial modules and is only 14 pin.

Edit, you could program the pic to appear as an 8 byte ram and use the additional pins as address pins to enable multiple devices to be used.

Mike.
 
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JonSea

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Spec, the first one is exactly what I need! Right up to the point where the data sheet says there's a single, fixed I2C address. I have 32 LEDs to control so I'd need two of them. I could add an I2C switch to the mix but that's getting complicated.

Mike, the MAX7219 has crossed my mind, and it actually plays nicely on an I2C bus. The I2C devices will ignore the data sent to the MAX, and with its enable pin not asserted, it will ignore I2C traffic.
 

spec

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Spec, the first one is exactly what I need! Right up to the point where the data sheet says there's a single, fixed I2C address. I have 32 LEDs to control so I'd need two of them. I could add an I2C switch to the mix but that's getting complicated.
Damn, and I was feeling so pleased to have discovered what I thought was a solution.:)

spec
 

granddad

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The I2C devices will ignore the data sent to the MAX, and with its enable pin not asserted, it will ignore I2C traffic.
Now that is clever , Have used Max quite a bit, not sure how you would mux the Max data and clock... perhaps just join them together , perhaps you have no spare IO... and will just disable I2C , would a I2C expander MCP23017 do the job
 

JonSea

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My desire for the constant current approach is to eliminate the need for current limiting resistors. These take up a lot of area and add to the assembly time.
 

JonSea

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I decided to use the IS31FL3218 that Spec suggested, along with an I2C multiplxer. It adds some steps in the software to address which bank of LEDs to use but that won't add much complexity. Compared to the PCA9532 that Granddad recommended or even just an MCP23017, this saves 16 LED current-limiting resistors. This panel is used as an indicator panel in rack that will rarely be looked at, so the flashing/dimming features of the PCA9532 really don't add much to the design.

The picture shows the nearly completed board layout, designed for a 1U rack enclosure. The board lays out pretty nicely with these components.

Thanks for the suggestions!

I2C V2.jpg
 

spec

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No probs from me JonSea.:)

I learnt something about I2C and constant current chips because of your post.

The PCB looks pretty neat

spec
 

JonSea

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Around a buck and a half. Good stock available too.

Here's what Octopart says:

Screenshot_2017-02-10-23-38-04.jpg
 

JonSea

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Mike, I'm happy with my design now. It does the job with a minimal number of components of a size that are easy to work with. Thanks all for the comments.
 
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