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I want to learn. Good books?

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I have all ways been interested in electronics, I bought two small kits one is for two dice and the other is a scrolling message with LED. I can just put the kits together but I would like to learn how they work, that way I can make my own little kits from just parts. I wanted to know if any of you had some good books that you learned from?

Thanks,
Kyle
 

laroche73

New Member
recommended books

try finding a used copy of "The Art of Electronics" by Horowitz & Hill. My copy (since passed on) was from 1980, and I learned a lot from it. The authors manage to cover a great deal of territory in a single volume.

- CAL
 
Books

I am selling my copy of the book of Art of Electronics by Horowitz and Hill.
 

laroche73

New Member
starter books

In regard to your comment, it started for me around 6 when I tried to construct a morse code keyer from a salvaged radio loudspeaker, a hacksaw blade with some tape on the end, and the AC power line. The shower of sparks told me it wasn't a sound idea.

I don't know if Radio Shack still sells those "project books", but they gave me a good start. I remember Forest Mimms being the author, but maybe I'm confusing RS with Popular Electronics, another good source. Also the old '73 magazines were great if you can still find some around. Don Lancaster's cookbooks are quite dated now, but easily read and contain lots of helpful information. best regards.
 

para_cavern

New Member
look out for books by bernard bibani publishers, these are excellect for those who want to learn elctronics as they have such a simple way of explaining things
 

KOLAKING

New Member
The art of electronics is a pretty complicated book for a new-comer to understand, it's an actual textbook for Harvard electronics students! May I suggest "There Are No Electrons" by Ken Amdal (not sure of last name spelling), it's told as a fictional story and easily explains basic theory and components. Another good one is "Electronics Made Easy" by Barron books. I have a dozen books on electronics and have been studying it for two years and still have trouble grasping and visualizing how circuits behave, it's not easy to visualize abstract ideas. Good luck........KK
 

laroche73

New Member
level of difficulty

A books' level of difficulty can be hard to pin down, a lot depends on your motivation and whether the writing style clicks with you.

True, A of E is used as a college-text (at Harvard, not MIT, no disrespect meant for Harvard, it's used in an intro course for students who are often pursuing other majors), but it's quite unlike most of the other college-level texts I've seen. The book is written in an easy to understand conversational style, and the authors do a nice job of getting the basics across. Analog, digital and microprocessor electronics all get some degree of coverage. It's probably one of the single best volumes I'd recommend to someone wanting a good general grounding in electronics. It makes a good component in a self-study electronics course.

There are plenty of simpler texts to start with, and you may want to, but if your goal is to understand how electronic devices work well enough to design some from scratch, A of E is worth a look.

The book is pricey, finding an older, used edition may be a better bet.
 

KOLAKING

New Member
I guess it is written in an easy to understand way, it is just Alot of information and can get pretty deep when digital appears. It is the best general reference book for all the electronics realm but bypasses basic electricity which is paramount for a newbie to understand.....KK
 

Nostrafus

New Member
Also if you can find a for dummies, or idiots guide version of electronics, they're always really good references if you have no idea what you're doing, they take about twice the time to explain things to you from several different angles instead of teaching you the way the author of another book learned and that's all there is to it.

Not saying you're an idiot or anything, they're just some of the best informational books out there.

I'm just waiting for "The Idiots Guide to Becoming a Tattoo Artist" yep I love me some tattoo's.
 

spuffock

Member
If you see a copy of "the art of electronics" by Horowitz and Hill, BUY IT.
It contains a huge amount of information on just about every aspect of electronics, and best of all you don't need a degree in maths to understand it. I haven't seen another book that comes anywhere close.
I bought mine when it first appeared and I'm NOT selling it.
 
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