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I really need help

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oro

New Member
I am a noob in electronics.So I was messing with a transistor and an led on my arduino uno.I messed up .I fried the board and saw smoke coming out of the transistor next to the power plug .It won't work.Does anyone know the part and knows how to fix it? I'm on the literal verge of tears because it was a gift and I can't afford a new one.Thank you.

Thanks for all the responses.meme.jpg
the transistor in the red circles is bumped and started sending up smoke.
Im in the US


Another edit , I have connected a 5 volt usb and the code I had on it still works.The problem is that I tried to upload new code and my computer does not recognize it .
 
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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Don't cry yet, all may not be lost. From the schematic I imagine you blew the regulator based on your description. You may have just smoked IC2, but it is really hard to say. Try pulling the part and measure ohms from +5v to ground. It should read >1k ohm. My arduino does not match the schematic so I am not sure. If it reads very low, you still have other damaged parts.

 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi,

Also, if you could provide a drawing of how you hooked it up just before it blew that would help evaluate what went wrong.

And what kind of Arduino was is, Nano, Uno, etc. ?
I ask this because you can get a new Nano for about $3 USD with free shipping from a place called "Banggood" (online store) and several people on this forum have ordered from them and got a lot of different parts like that. A new Uno is a little more. The shipping takes a little longer but once you get it you'll have a brand new one. I then suggest that you go to the Arduino site forum and ask about how to connect other things to the board or ask right here. If you need a Nano with a USB cable also then it's a little over $4 USD. Uno's are about $5 USD.
You did not specify your country so you have to check if they ship to your country, but they do ship to most countries i think.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Hi,

Also, if you could provide a drawing of how you hooked it up just before it blew that would help evaluate what went wrong.

And what kind of Arduino was is, Nano, Uno, etc. ?
I ask this because you can get a new Nano for about $3 USD with free shipping from a place called "Banggood" (online store) and several people on this forum have ordered from them and got a lot of different parts like that. A new Uno is a little more. The shipping takes a little longer but once you get it you'll have a brand new one. I then suggest that you go to the Arduino site forum and ask about how to connect other things to the board or ask right here. If you need a Nano with a USB cable also then it's a little over $4 USD. Uno's are about $5 USD.
You did not specify your country so you have to check if they ship to your country, but they do ship to most countries i think.
Good suggestion, really hard to say with such little information. I am still stoked over a great Superbowl game :)
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
One thing I noticed in the schematic is the two regulators in parallel, my UNO has only one. Maybe there are different versions eh?
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Oro,

Sorry to hear about the mishap with your Arduino.

I am assuming that when you say transistor you are in fact referring to the voltage regulator chip U1 in the schematic below.

Afraid to say that your Arduino may be a write-off, but there is also a good chance that the voltage regulator chip, failed short-circuit to ground and saved the rest of the board.

Arduinos can operate from a non-regulated supply of about 6 to 14V: I would guess that you exceeded 14V and that blew the voltage regulator chip. On the other hand if you connected more than 5V to one of the GPIO pins on the Arduino that is liable to write the processor off but you may be lucky.

Arduinos can also operate from a regulated 5V supply line from a USB power source. You could try this and your Arduino may still work. But the chances are that you will have to remove the damaged regulator chip and then see if the Arduino will run from a 5V USB source.

If you don't have the proper equipment and you are good with your hands you can simply cut out the damaged voltage regulator chip with a small craft knife, but you must be very careful not to damage the printed circuit board that the regulator chip is soldered to.

Alternatively, you can smash the case of the regulator with a small pair of pliers. It does not matter if there are bits of the regulator still attached to the printed circuit board so long as there is a gap between the three or four legs of the voltage regulator chip.

If you are thinking of replacing the regulator chip, it is normally part number: NCP1117ST50-3G but there are many similar regulator chips used, so look for the 1117 50 bit in the part number (the 50 means 5V regulated output). AMS1170-50 is a common part number. 1117 50 voltage regulator chips are available on the net for around $1US with free post and packing; make sure you get the 5V version and not the 3.3V version which is more commonly available. But you will need to get someone with the right equipment to remove the old voltage regulator chip and fit the new voltage regulator chip.

But, as the other members have stated, Arduinos are so cheap, depending also on the specific Arduino that you have, that it is hardly worth repairing a damaged Arduino.:)


VOLTAGE REGULATOR SUPPLIER LINK

http://www.ebay.com.sg/itm/AMS1117-...hash=item33c37bb61b:m:m9PR62n_w7NsGJVbfGndKpA

VOLTAGE REGULATOR DATASHEET
 

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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
If you don't have the proper equipment and you are good with your hands you can simply cut out the damaged voltage regulator chip with a small craft knife, but you must be very careful not to damage the printed circuit board that the regulator chip is solder
Why not just clip the leads on the regulator going to the board? Looks simple enough to do.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
I would also check diode D1. May be open.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Arduinos can also operate from a regulated 5V supply line from a USB power source. You could try this and your Arduino may still work. But the chances are that you will have to remove the damaged regulator chip and then see if the Arduino will run from a 5V USB source.
Is there any chance of the OP damaging the USB port in doing this?
I am willing to bet that he just put a direct short from +5v to gnd and everything else is just fine.

Reminds me of the old adage, measure twice, cut once... :)
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Is there any chance of the OP damaging the USB port in doing this?
I am willing to bet that he just put a direct short from +5v to gnd and everything else is just fine.

Reminds me of the old adage, measure twice, cut once... :)
I'm not sure that shorting the 5V supply line from the voltage regulator to 0V would do any damage because the voltage regulator has thermal and current overload protection.

Similarly, USB 5v sources are normally tolerant of a short circuit.

My feeling is that there has been an over voltage somewhere, possibly on one of the controller chip GPIO pins.

spec
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure that shorting the 5V supply line from the voltage regulator to 0V would do any damage because the voltage regulator has thermal and current overload protection.
In that case, I would say the board is toast.

Similarly, USB 5v sources are normally tolerant of a short circuit
Would you be willing to risk your PC making that assumption?
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Oro,

Sorry to hear about the mishap with your Arduino.

I am assuming that when you say transistor you are in fact referring to the voltage regulator chip U1 in the schematic below.

Afraid to say that your Arduino may be a write-off, but there is also a good chance that the voltage regulator chip, failed short-circuit to ground and saved the rest of the board.

Arduinos can operate from a non-regulated supply of about 6 to 14V: I would guess that you exceeded 14V and that blew the voltage regulator chip. On the other hand if you connected more than 5V to one of the GPIO pins on the Arduino that is liable to write the processor off but you may be lucky.

Arduinos can also operate from a regulated 5V supply line from a USB power source. You could try this and your Arduino may still work. But the chances are that you will have to remove the damaged regulator chip and then see if the Arduino will run from a 5V USB source.

If you don't have the proper equipment and you are good with your hands you can simply cut out the damaged voltage regulator chip with a small craft knife, but you must be very careful not to damage the printed circuit board that the regulator chip is soldered to.

Alternatively, you can smash the case of the regulator with a small pair of pliers. It does not matter if there are bits of the regulator still attached to the printed circuit board so long as there is a gap between the three or four legs of the voltage regulator chip.

If you are thinking of replacing the regulator chip, it is normally part number: NCP1117ST50-3G but there are many similar regulator chips used, so look for the 1117 50 bit in the part number (the 50 means 5V regulated output). AMS1170-50 is a common part number. 1117 50 voltage regulator chips are available on the net for around $1US with free post and packing; make sure you get the 5V version and not the 3.3V version which is more commonly available. But you will need to get someone with the right equipment to remove the old voltage regulator chip and fit the new voltage regulator chip.

But, as the other members have stated, Arduinos are so cheap, depending also on the specific Arduino that you have, that it is hardly worth repairing a damaged Arduino.:)


VOLTAGE REGULATOR SUPPLIER LINK

http://www.ebay.com.sg/itm/AMS1117-...hash=item33c37bb61b:m:m9PR62n_w7NsGJVbfGndKpA

VOLTAGE REGULATOR DATASHEET
Hi,

Nice to see the whole schematic in one shot like that.

I messed up one of my Nanos by pulling UP too hard on the small mini USB connector that is soldered to the board when i went to remove the cable. It ripped the whole connector right off the board. Nasty. Lucky the Nano still works, but i'd have to program it with a serial programmer, as when using a second Arduino "as programmer" and with some jumpers.
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi,

Nice to see the whole schematic in one shot like that.

I messed up one of my Nanos by pulling UP too hard on the small mini USB connector that is soldered to the board when i went to remove the cable. It ripped the whole connector right off the board. Nasty. Lucky the Nano still works, but i'd have to program it with a serial programmer, as when using a second Arduino "as programmer" and with some jumpers.
It is annoying when you do something like that.

I fu**ed one of the USB sockets on my laptop by plugging in a faulty USB plug and also trashed a HDD by spilling beer on it.:banghead:

Seems like many people are getting into Arduinos and Raspberry Pi these days. I have a few of each in the spares box but have only looked at the theory side so far.

spec
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It is annoying when you do something like that.

I fu**ed one of the USB sockets on my laptop by plugging in a faulty USB plug and also trashed a HDD by spilling beer on it.:banghead:

Seems like many people are getting into Arduinos and Raspberry Pi these days. I have a few of each in the spares box but have only looked at the theory side so far.

spec
Hi again,

Wow, definitely not good, sorry to hear about that. How was the USB plug faulty? Just wondering how it could mess up a socket.
What a sad use of a precious liquid (beer, haha). For that i guess the HDD was out of the computer?

I came close to ruining a Uno by plugging it into the USB 3.0 socket BACKWARDS (or upside down). Normally this cant happen, but beware, i had what i guess was a cheap hub and the clearance on the plug socket was so great that it actually let it be plugged in upside down. Never saw that happen before. It blew the USB port, but it reset after reboot luckily. The Uno survived somehow. I was lucky that time.

Yeah a lot of people are getting into Arduino because of three main factors i believe:
1. Low cost, even to start with your first one, and free IDE.
2. Programs are done in C or C++ and are pretty easy to get up and running, so once you do a little programming in the IDE and get used to it a little you can create applications and projects in an hour or less sometimes, depending of course on how sophisticated they have to be.
3. No programmer required, just plug into the USB and the IDE can upload programs into the chip on board.

But even an LED blink program takes less than 15 minutes to create and upload and run. There's so little too it. That acts as groundwork for more complex projects, which are not that hard to produce really.

The Arduino has an I2C library so you can use displays as easy as sending characters to a port. Easy to use displays include the 1602 and 2004 displays, which require almost no work to get going.

If you havent used one yet you should give it a try, you'll be surprised at how simple it can be. Beware though you'll get hooked :)
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi MA,
Wow, definitely not good, sorry to hear about that. How was the USB plug faulty? Just wondering how it could mess up a socket.
If I posted my opinion of the mechanical side of the USB standards the ETO mods would probably sensor it.

I have had no end of problems with USB, especially the 5V supply line which can get to quite a low voltage by the time it gets to the sink equipment.

But, in the case of the damaged laptop USB port, I was on the road and had an old USB cable in the laptop bag, so I just plugged it in. The signal was intermittent but if I held the connector at a certain angle it worked long enough for the purpose. But, when I pulled the plug out it ripped one on the printed circuit traces on the USB socket on the laptop. Luckily, being a Lenovo it is a simple and cheap job to simply change the little USB sub board- which I haven't done.

Now I always check the condition of any plugs before letting them anyway near any equipment.

What a sad use of a precious liquid (beer, haha). For that i guess the HDD was out of the computer?
The HDD was in the ultra bay on the same laptop. I put the laptop on the wooden floor in our lounge and got a bottle of beer from the freezer, put the bottle of beer on the floor near the laptop and over it went. Just the slightest amount of beer splashed on the laptop and just a drop got into the ultra bay and minute amount must have got into the HDD via the breather. I was not too happy for a few weeks because the ultra bay HDD had some important non-backed data.:banghead:

Yeah a lot of people are getting into Arduino because of three main factors i believe:
1. Low cost, even to start with your first one, and free IDE.
2. Programs are done in C or C++ and are pretty easy to get up and running, so once you do a little programming in the IDE and get used to it a little you can create applications and projects in an hour or less sometimes, depending of course on how sophisticated they have to be.
3. No programmer required, just plug into the USB and the IDE can upload programs into the chip on board.

But even an LED blink program takes less than 15 minutes to create and upload and run. There's so little too it. That acts as groundwork for more complex projects, which are not that hard to produce really.

The Arduino has an I2C library so you can use displays as easy as sending characters to a port. Easy to use displays include the 1602 and 2004 displays, which require almost no work to get going.

If you havent used one yet you should give it a try, you'll be surprised at how simple it can be. Beware though you'll get hooked :)
I can't wait to do some controller programming- been meaning to do it for the last 37 years.:)

spec
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Seems like many people are getting into Arduinos and Raspberry Pi these days.
I think this is due to the open source platform, at least that's what I read.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
No mention of PC- I would have no hesitation in using a $2US USB wall wart though.
Gee, I did not even think of that. :banghead:
 
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