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I need help...

Bcicbi

New Member
while it's been my experience that Fujitsu hard drives are reliable, i don't have any data available on their power cords....

when working with lithium batteries, it's usually a good idea to keep a bucket of sand around to put burning/burnt batteries into. don't expose burning lithium batteries to water, it'll just make things worse.
Im keeping the battery unused in my storage room...will it explode?
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
How many times do I have to say do not keep it in the house? It's like talking to a wall.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Well i asked my teacher and he said if the smoke came out than something is burnt and it could not explode but i am still paranoid
Don't leave it in the house. I don't see how the logic that if smoke came out and something is burnt then it cannot explode. It's still full of reactive chemicals in that can still react. It's not like burning a tank of as dry so nothing is left to burn. The battery is still full of lithium salts. Once it's exploded into flames THEN there's nothing left to burn.
 

Bcicbi

New Member
Don't leave it in the house. I don't see how the logic that if smoke came out and something is burnt then it cannot explode. It's still full of reactive chemicals in a damaged battery that can still react.
How should i store it outside?
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'd put it in a metal can away from the house. Maybe fill it with sand untul until you can dispose of it at an eco center. If you use a lid, don't seal it. If the worst happens you want a way for the pressure to relieve itself rather than turn into a bomb.

People online say a salt bath to discharge it, but there is debate as to whether that actually does anything.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Well my battery is a certified asus battery...it is not a cheap chinese version
It's also damaged. Being brand name or tested, or certified means nothing when something is damaged, especially when the specific damage is unknown. When things are damaged, you can't rely on any safeguards that were in place. I don't know what is so difficult to understand about this and I don't know why you are so insistent on storing trash indoors.
 

Bcicbi

New Member
Well my battery is a certified asus battery...it is not a cheap chinese version
I put tape on the connectors then i placed it in a unused fireplace...now i am safe...we rented the house recently and that man is gonna come and take that fireplace...i am safe for now
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
lithium is one of the Alkali Metals, and is highly reactive. if the battery is damaged, you should put it in a metal bucket of sand, cover the battery with more sand, and rest a metal plate on top to cover the bucket, and keep it outside. while lithium doesn't react as vigorously with water as sodium or potassium, it is from the same group of elements and should be treated with a lot of respect. the lithium/water reaction releases hydrogen gas, which is a fire hazard. the reaction can take place with humid air, and the reaction creates enough heat to self-ignite the hydrogen, this is why it must be kept outside. if kept indoors, a buildup of hydrogen gas and any spark can cause a fire. outdoors, any hydrogen escaping from the battery gets dispersed and is not a hazard.
 

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