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How Exactly Does...

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Blueteeth

Well-Known Member
Did you google?

'bistable memory element' gave me plenty of hits.

Ask yourself what 'bistable' means. :)

I would explain, but I'm sure your own research will give you a better understanding. Perhaps search for schematics and application circuits? Practicality is as, if not more, important than theory.
 

Dean Huster

Well-Known Member
A bistable element could be a small square piece of cardboard with "0" written on one side and "1" on the other. Turn the card so the "1" is visible to remember "1"; turn it so the "0" is visible to remember "0". Two possible card positions ("0" and "1") makes it a bistable element. "Bi" meaning there are two stable states; "stable" meaning that one the card is flipped to the desired position ("0" or "1"), nothing will change it other than a deliberate change to the other position -- short of a blast of air or an earthquake in the case of a card).

Dean
 

ke5frf

New Member
Bi=two, having two states

Stable=steady

Having two steady states, having two measurable conditions.

Yes/No
On/Off
High/Low
0/1


Decode the following and you'll have it all figured out! Anyone, feel free if he can't do it.


01001110011011110111011100100000011110010110111101110101001000000110101101101110011011110111011100100000011010000110111101110111001000000110001001101001011011100110000101110010011110010010000001110111011011110111001001101011011100110010110000100000011000010110111001100100001000000111100101101111011101010010000001110011011010000110111101110101011011000110010000100000011101010110111001100100011001010111001001110011011101000110000101101110011001000010000001101000011011110111011100100000011000010010000001100010011010010111001101110100011000010110001001101100011001010010000001100101011011000110010101101101011001010110111001110100001000000110001101100001011011100010000001110011011101000110111101110010011001010010000001101101011001010110110101101111011100100111100100101110001000000101010001101000011010010111001100100000011010010111001100100000011010000110111101110111001000000110000100100000011000110110111101101101011100000111010101110100011001010111001000100000011101110110111101110010011010110111001100101110
 

mbarazeen

Member
in practice two transistors of BJT or MOSFET can be arrange in such a way to be triggered by two different inputs to make both of them On and off in complimentry basis, ie once you apply a voltage to one transistor input them it will tun on making other to turn off, and vise versa with the other input. so EVEN IF YOU REMOVE THIS INPUT THE CHANGE STILL REMAIN THE SAME. ie: at 0,0 input. here 1,1 is not allowed.

so even after you remove the input it remains on the last state so it can be used as a device to remember what really has hapened to iot last, this is how memories are made.

just try some search and see how memories are made.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Now you know how binary works, and you should understand how a bistable element can store memory. This is how a computer works.
r.vittal I think Ke5's post was pretty clear, though I think he should have mentioned that it was binary encoded ascii.

Multivibrator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
may also help you, read the section entitled bistable. There is an example circuit of a basic bistable transistor circuit.

Transistor_Bistable-1.svg
 
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Roff

Well-Known Member
thanks ... Bistable element = Multivibrator :)
Read the definitions again. Not all multivibrators are bistable.
Furthermore, not all bistable elements used in electronics are multivibrators. For example, latching relays and magnetic memory cores are bistable, but I don't think they could be termed multivibrators.
 
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