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Home Project: Question on what motor to get for a battery-powered, motorized, high-speed 'lazy susan'

helencferry

New Member
Hi, I wonder if anyone could help me!

In my project, I want to create a battery-powered motorized ‘lazy susan’, where the top part of wood will spin with an object on top. I am quite confident on how I will attach all the components to do this as there are many youtube tutorials on the internet that show a similar thing – here is a link to one that might give you a better idea of what I am talking about:
)

But what I am unsure of is what type of motor to get, so my question is:


What type of motor and battery voltage do I need to support the load of around 1.2kg of weight (the combined weight of the top piece of wood that will spin and the object on top of that) and still spin the load quite fast (up to 120rpm)?


I understand that the speed of the motor reduces with more load but I am unsure of how to work out what type of motor and battery I will need for my requirements.

I will also be attaching a reducer to my circuit so that I can control the speed of the motor.

The 'lazy susan' has to be battery powered as I intend to film it outside.


Any help would be really appreciated,

Helen
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Links:
Probably the one in the picture. (video)
I have these, but not from here. These come with different gear ratios. Smaller motor.
Servo The Servo motors mostly come 180 degrees of turn but some are built for running wheels a run continuous. They come in many different sizes, and turn rates. I would look hard at this type. Most have good control of speed.
Pololu I got some robot motors here. They have many pieces of hardware and motors.
 
Last edited:

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
helencferry , the weight is less of an issue when selecting a motor than the overall friction. The weight and motor torque will determine how quickly you can get to your target speed. I assume it is not exactly a lazy Suzan as most people would imagine to access the salt and pepper shakers or rotate a statue for display and since you didn't share, I'll leave you to your project detail.

your bearings and methods to connect the mechanical power all create friction. If you look at a phonograph, you can take one apart and understand how they work and see the mechanical setup (it may be direct drive or belt drive). Then you can s translate the idea to your wood block (or attach your wood platform to the phonograph and then we can help you power the motor to get the speed you want.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Search for "Lazy Susan" hardware.
In the video the motor must hold all the force of the turn table and object. If weight is not balanced there will be much force on motor.
If you have a Lazy Susan type of bearing the weight will be on the ball bearings which are built for that. This allows a low cost motor to apply turn force with out having to hold the weight.
1620963537212.png
 

helencferry

New Member
are you displaying objects or throwing them? 120RPM is two rotations per second...
Thank you for your reply. The object will be attached to the piece of wood. 1.2kg is the combined weight of the top piece of wood and the object (mostly the piece of wood) but on second thoughts, I think I will lower the speed and choose a lighter piece of wood. It is for an art installation project with a friend. We're spinning these woven cylindrical objects that when when rotated, the pattern will appear to move - a bit like a barber's pole! It needs to spin fast enough to appear to move but could still be effective at 80rpm or maybe less. I just wanted the flexibility to increase or decrease the speed.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
if you ever saw a LP turntable for playing records 33 1/3 RPM is fast. 45 is faster. 78 is really fast.

Can you use Balsa wood?
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thank you for your reply. The object will be attached to the piece of wood. 1.2kg is the combined weight of the top piece of wood and the object (mostly the piece of wood) but on second thoughts, I think I will lower the speed and choose a lighter piece of wood. It is for an art installation project with a friend. We're spinning these woven cylindrical objects that when when rotated, the pattern will appear to move - a bit like a barber's pole! It needs to spin fast enough to appear to move but could still be effective at 80rpm or maybe less. I just wanted the flexibility to increase or decrease the speed.
Is this for a bloom type molding? If so, they need very accurate spinning and coordinated strobe light.

Example bloom,

Mike.
Edit, give the video a few seconds until it gets to blooms.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I vaguely remember that LPs ran at 33rmp and there were ELP that I think ran at 16. But it was a long time ago so probably wrong.

Mike.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I vaguely remember that LPs ran at 33rmp and there were ELP that I think ran at 16. But it was a long time ago so probably wrong.

Mike.
I did a quick google, and as I've always thought, they were basically for talking books - apart from South Africa who apparently released low quality music on them, and a weird background music system from Seeburg using stacked 9 inch discs.
 

Pommie

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As I said, long time ago and (very) probably wrong. But I do seem to remember ELPs - Extra Long Players - maybe they just had more grooves.

Mike.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
As I said, long time ago and (very) probably wrong. But I do seem to remember ELPs - Extra Long Players - maybe they just had more grooves.
I've never heard of ELP's - you couldn't have grooves because there's no room.

LP's DID use microgrooves though (so smaller thinner grooves), which is why you had a reversible stylus (LP/78), to match the different groove sizes. I would 'presume' 16 records used 78 type styli, as they were pre-microgroove.
 

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