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Home automation using ESP8266 and Xbee

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#22
I knew that .lol so many think the 3 volt chips are hard to use there not.
I can't really see any problem with 3.3V?, many (if not most) of the external chips are now 3.3V, so it makes sense to run the processor at 3.3V as well.

Some devices do need 5V though (such as LCD text modules) then it's down to deciding what to run the processor from, and which way would be easier.

It's really best if you can try and use devices (such as PIC's) which work equally well on either.
 

be80be

Well-Known Member
#24
You know these things are in led lights there dirt cheap I got one from lowes it had a esp in it.
There not that hard to work with yes you have to dig in the dirt to find the pinouts no big deal tho if you know what your looking for.
I never used the esp-1 hell you can get the 12E for nothing Ive got some for less then a dollar there small and easy to put in things like outlet boxes and simple to get working
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#25
The documentation is awful, on top of that its almost impossible to find. No one knows which version is this and which pin is it....
What on earth are you on about?, your post makes no sense as you don't even make any suggestion as to what you're referring to - if it's ESP devices, then there's plenty of documentation and examples out there.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#26
The documentation is awful, on top of that its almost impossible to find. No one knows which version is this and which pin is it....
Maybe true in 2012 but, times, my friend, are a changin'.

Download the ESP8266WiFi library for arduino. ESP8266wifi (pay attention to upper/lowe case in library name), then follow the basic instructions on any of the hundreds of tutorials on how to adjust your code to be a router for a stand-alone network, an access point on your existing network or simply another connected device on your existing network. Then decide what commmunication protocol - web (socket 80 or 8080) are easiest to act as web client or web server.

When you connect, select any of the common two dozen different breakout boards available - of the six different versions I have used, the pin assignments are perfect on the Arduino IDE.

Any other complaints are purely associated with lazyness or fear of the unknown.

I can google for you if you need someone to hold your hand for the first effort.
 
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be80be

Well-Known Member
#28
I agree I always started with the datasheet I found that fast took a little longer for English one but it wasn't that hard to use I used Lua
at first then arduino ide. Never could understand using a arduino uno with it.
these

Has usable pins and ADC and there cheap.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#29
I agree I always started with the datasheet I found that fast took a little longer for English one but it wasn't that hard to use I used Lua
at first then arduino ide. Never could understand using a arduino uno with it.
these

Has usable pins and ADC and there cheap.
My ESP of choice is the Wemos mini, basically that module mounted on a small PCB with the required extra bits :D

I see there's a new Wemos mini out now as well, a few tweaks, and in particular solder pads for linking across for sleep mode (saves you running a bit of wire).
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#30
My ESP of choice is the Wemos mini, basically that module mounted on a small PCB with the required extra bits :D

I see there's a new Wemos mini out now as well, a few tweaks, and in particular solder pads for linking across for sleep mode (saves you running a bit of wire).
In one of my projects, I set up a display of an "antique" toy for a collector. The original analog Futaba RC remote control receiver kept picking up noise and readjusting servo position when nobody was moving a control lever (startling him, his wife and visitors). I replaced the guts of the radio and receiver with ESP8266 modules. The cool part of retrofitting ESP8266 modules into radio (client) and receiver (server), is the receiver can tell tell the radio that an instruction has been received. Also, the owner can use his phone or tablet to send instructions if he doesn't want to get up to grab the radio.
 
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