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Help with treadmill with broken console PCB

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sepra7

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Hello all,

I have a treadmill that is in great working condition, except for the console PCB. voltage diagram attached.

The power board has a troubleshooting LED that monitors the speed control signal being sent from the console. It passes through the power board and on to the PWM motor controller. The LED should flicker when speed is set above 0 MPH. It does not, and the DC drive motor will not turn. Also, the AC incline motor will not turn when incline is increased at the console. However, I have gotten the drive motor to move when I attached a 1.5V battery to the PWM speed control, and I have gotten the incline motor to turn when jumping on the console PCB.

I was hoping I could substitute for the console speed control signal with an external VDC source that I could vary to change speed. Is this possible, and if so, how would it be accomplished?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 

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kchriste

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Here is a simple way to do it that might work. Note that any safety features to turn off the treadmill (Usually a lanyard connected to the user) will probably not work once modified.
 

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sepra7

New Member
PWM pictures

PWM PCB pictures
 

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ke5frf

New Member
Instead of reinventing the wheel, why not try finding the fault and fixing it?

This can be challenging without a component-level schematic, but not impossible, especially with a little help!

It SOUNDS to me like one of your DC supply voltages is faulty, coming from the power board to the console board. Even if one voltage level is present, it is no gaurantee that another one isn't faulty. I was even considering that the RED 8-12 volt input at the console may be regulated down to 5 volts on the console board, for logic level circuits. Do you see a regulator or zener diode on that board?

Have you checked the 8-12 volts for presence and ripple?
Does the console power up otherwise, in other words are their LCDs, indicators that would require logic level voltages?

Have you attempted to identify the manufacturer, give them a call (use Google) and get a better schematic via e-mail. Often they won't, but SOMETIMES they will.

At first glance I considered the thermal cutout switch being in series with the AC voltage cutting things out, but it appears to only be connected to the PMW board, so the AC lift motor failure wouldn't apply.

Then again, do you have any idea what voltage L,W,H on the PMW board to the power board represents? If this AC voltage it might control the AC motor...and being the AC motor is black,red,white wire...and L,W,H is the same color scheme, and being it comes off he PMW board, perhaps my concern for the thermal cutoff at the DC motor is valid.

Have you checked continuity at this switch? Trust me, mechanical components such as this that regularly get stressed with heat and high current are always a top suspect!!!

I also observed in the photo that two of the smaller electrolytic caps, the smallers ones near C30, may have a slight bulge. Photograph isn't abundantly clear though. If they are bulging, especially at the foil top, replace them with suitable same value caps. Cheap chinese caps flooded the market a few years back and many consumer electronics are paying the price. I don't do consumer repairs regularly, but I've replaced caps in my dvd player and a friends HD television in recent months.

I hope my suggestions lead you on a good track!!
 

kchriste

New Member
Forum Supporter
Copy of my reply to a PM from sepra7:
A quick Google search turned up this site. I've never dealt with them or know anything about them, but it appears that they carry parts for your treadmill or can fix the board you have. They also have some trouble shooting tips on their site. Good luck!
 
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