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Help reducing DC wheelchair motor noise

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Team PSU

New Member
Good evening,
A partner and I have been working all semester on a robotics project and it is winding down now. We have 2 Merits P120 DC wheelchair motors being driven by a MD22 which interprets the signals from our Spektrum Dx6i wireless remote control system. However, we have alot of noise issues with our other servo motors when the wheelchair motors are powered up. We actually have 3 other servo motors that are easily controlled with the R/C system, until we power up the DC wheelchair motors.

We have attempted to place 470uF, 50 volt caps across the + and -- leads, and it did reduce the noise slightly, just not enough to the point where we can effectively control the other 3 servo motors.

What do you all suggest we try next?

Edit- we have the leads twisted and a majority of our wiring in plastic loom.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Bigger capacitor?
 

phoenox

New Member
Try running the Wheelchair motors on a completely seperate circuit from the other servo motors. I have had problems with motor noise where the noise was picked up even when I had a different battery running the motor than the controller. I fixed it by moving the motor farther away. A metal box around the controller might also be effective.
 

Team PSU

New Member
phoenox, that actually is what we tried yesterday and it eliminated 95% of the jitter. We powered the DC wheelchair motors with the 24V system and then put the 3 other servos on a separate power source. This helped tremendously but now we are stuck having to use 2 separate R/C transmitters and receivers. One to control the drive motors, and one to control the servos and other functions...
It will work for our demonstration tomorrow but it is not ideal...
Gotta compromise I suppose
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Using a diode before the input cap will prevent the input cap from discharging to the main power supply when the voltage starts to drop, if you use large enough capacitors the problem should go away with the diode.
 
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