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Help identifying transformer component

Tomthebomb01

New Member
Hello, new to the forum!
I am repairing a battery charger that was dropped. I found this transformer component broken off the PCB when disassembled. I am having trouble identifying it and sourcing a replacement and wondered if anyone could help.
I removed the yellow tape In hopes to find a part number ant it fell to bits and no luck.
It also only appears to have 4 pins soldered to the board.

on the back of the charger is as follows
input 230v AC 50Hz 3A
Output 12 DC 4/12/25A

Regards
Tom
20200601_102207.jpg15910119554877726774123245947553.jpg1591012028808191548921506684381.jpg
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
It's switch-mode, so it's a custom made device - the only place to source a replacement would be the manufacturer of the actual board who will be having it specially made.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You can get an off-board power supply of the right DC voltage and wire it into the appropriate output of the Power supply section of board.

if you can figure out the operatingDC voltage of the board, you can calculate the amperage of the power supply needed by looking at the AC wattage rating and dividing by the DC voltage of the board. For example, a 90w device running at 12VDC will require 8 amps minimum (like 10 to 12 amps). Then you'll have to figure out where the power supply output is on the board.
 

KMoffett

Well-Known Member
PQ3230 is a core used in tranformers and inductors. The braided wire on the bobbin in the second photo makes me think it's a high current choke. Can you post a photo for the back side so we can see how the pins were connected?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
PQ3230 is a core used in tranformers and inductors. The braided wire on the bobbin in the second photo makes me think it's a high current choke. Can you post a photo for the back side so we can see how the pins were connected?
The top right pin of the component appears to have a thin wire soldered to it, and presumably the top left (out of sight) also does, this led me to presume it's a transformer.

But as you say, a picture of the rear would help to clear it up.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
On the last image, the silkscreen designation shows "L2" next to the damaged component.

But you are correct, there are three visible terminals......... but perhaps one of them is for mechanical stability only? Difficult to know.

As mentioned previously an image of the board's rear would significantly clear the confusion.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
On the last image, the silkscreen designation shows "L2" next to the damaged component.

But you are correct, there are three visible terminals......... but perhaps one of them is for mechanical stability only? Difficult to know.
Not just a pin, but a pon that appears to have a thin wire soldered to it.

As mentioned previously an image of the board's rear would significantly clear the confusion.
Yes it would, but it really makes no difference anyway (other than for our personal inquisitiveness), as regardless it's a custom device and won't be available as a spare, as pretty well all switch-mode transformers/chokes aren't.

There have been a 'few' exceptions in the 'TV' world, but not because they were available components, but because they failed fairly regularly, so component suppliers managed to find a source for them. The 'main' examples would be in analogue satellite receivers made by Pace, these could be easily sourced as Pace were based in Saltaire in the UK, where they designed and manufactured the boxes, so would happily either supply the transformers to wholesalers, or put them in contact with the manufacturers to source them. Another classic example would be backlight CCFL transformers, probably the most common been in small Beko sets, although a few other makes were easily available as well, simply because they were unreliable.

But for the vast majority failure of a switch-mode transformer is the 'kiss of death' :D
 

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