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Have you designed IoT project for company

jab99407

Member
Hardware selection depends on project requirements As far as I see on internet more and more people use raspberry and ESP board for IoT project.

Have you designed IoT project for company ? Do any company use ESP/PI to for their own IoT product or They develop their own board for IoT product. ?
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
We design pretty much everything from scratch, for commercial products.

The only exceptions are such as special function RF modules, to ensure the products comply with UK or international licencing requirements; we've used pre-approved modules like the Radiometrix TX3 & RX3, Microchip RN4020 Bluetooth etc.

For my own projects, I use whatever is suitable - I have about half a dozen Raspberry Pi's of different ages running various things, a few Arduinos, a Jetson Nano...
Plus a couple of ESP32s that I've not had chance to mess around with yet.
 

jab99407

Member
We design pretty much everything from scratch, for commercial products.

The only exceptions are such as special function RF modules, to ensure the products comply with UK or international licencing requirements; we've used pre-approved modules like the Radiometrix TX3 & RX3, Microchip RN4020 Bluetooth etc.

For my own projects, I use whatever is suitable - I have about half a dozen Raspberry Pi's of different ages running various things, a few Arduinos, a Jetson Nano...
Plus a couple of ESP32s that I've not had chance to mess around with yet.


My idea is to build the product for business purpose that control at least three light bulbs, two ceiling fan using mobile app wirelessly

Ceiling fan technical specification
  • Rated voltage : 220-240 v, AC, 50 Hz.
  • Power consumption: Not more than 63 watts.
light bulb technical specifications
  • Rated voltage : 220-240 v, AC, 50 Hz.
  • Power consumption: Not more than 10 watt
Raspberry is too costly for this project. I will use ESP32 for this project because I don't know the other part less price than ESP32. In your advice, what would be the suitable and low-cost parts for this project?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
The ESP8266 is cheaper than the ESP32, and while less powerful is more than enough for your very modest requirements, however the cost difference isn't used, and the Wemos Mini versions of both are fairly small.

I suggest you have a look at the Random Nerd website, which contains everything you need.

 

danadak

Active Member
Be aware that ESP8266 and ESP32 have crappy A/Ds in them. Worse the ESP32 datasheet
I looked at only had specs at 25C, pretty much useless if trying to get real 10 or 12 bit performance
over temp.

ESP8266 datasheets I looked at no specs, just says its 10 bit "precision". Uh-huh.....


Regards, Dana.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I will use ESP32 for this project because I don't know the other part less price than ESP32.
Be cautious of using WiFi - or 2.4GHz, anyway.

The 2.4GHz band is vastly overloaded in many cities and it may be impossible to get reliable operation.

There are other systems / protocols which are far better suited to such types of control - eg. Z-Wave or Zigbee.

If you have not looked in to Z-Wave, I suggest you do - it operates around 800-900 depending if it's EU or US standard, with each node also acting as a repeater / extender so the control reliability is excellent.

Interface devices are readily available as ICs or modules, and it gives you an extra selling point that it can integrate with existing Smarthome / Building management systems.




Be aware that any commercial product that directly controls mains voltages is likely to need to pass various safety and interference approvals - UL, CE etc. - before it can legally be sold. That can be extremely costly.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Be aware that ESP8266 and ESP32 have crappy A/Ds in them. Worse the ESP32 datasheet
I looked at only had specs at 25C, pretty much useless if trying to get real 10 or 12 bit performance
over temp.

ESP8266 datasheets I looked at no specs, just says its 10 bit "precision". Uh-huh.....


Regards, Dana.

Yes, pretty crappy A2D, and not even linear, particularly at the top and bottom ends. Useful for battery voltage monitoring though.
 

danadak

Active Member
You can "linearize" an onchip A/D using this technique at time of manufacture test -

1641212744346.png



Regards, Dana.
 

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