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Funny Images Thread!

rjenkinsgb

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That reminds me of some stuff I saw on an Air Cadets book stall at the last Finningley air show - surplus military manuals, including such gems as the "Improvised Munitions handbook", giving full details of how to make such as as demolition charges, shaped cutting charges, grenades etc. from scavenged materials...
 

shortbus=

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President trump has cancelled his trip to Viet Nam to meet with Kin Jong-un. Seems like his bone spurs started acting up again.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

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Over the roof would exceed the bend radius for the fire hose. Someone was "on the ball". Glass half empty - half full problem/

Then there is parking in front of a fire hydrant.
 

DerStrom8

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This is an actual vintage Snap-On oscilloscope from the late '50s. Who was the genius in the marketing department that came up with this one?

Snap-On Scope.jpg
 

JimB

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Who was the genius in the marketing department that came up with this one?
It could even have been an engineer with a wicked sense of humour.

I once had a specification which asked for a piece of test equipment which was described as a "Function And Response Tester".
Needles to say, when the job was actually built the more conventional description for that piece of equipment was used.

On another project that I came across after it was completed, a supplementary hydraulic reservoir had been maliciously named as "Auxiliary Reservoir Supply Extension".
This name survived all the way through the project and into the final documentation.

JimB
 

MikeMl

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...
On another project that I came across after it was completed, a supplementary hydraulic reservoir had been maliciously named as "Auxiliary Reservoir Supply Extension"....
Joke would be lost on most Yanks. Over here it would have to be "Auxiliary Supply Source".
 

DerStrom8

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unclejed613

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that one wasn't hard to figure out.... my most recent favorite was a Samsung Blu-Ray player service manual. the fluorescent display had the initials for "Fluorescent Unit", and the serial clock that went to it (yes, they did, they used the standard "CK" abbreviation for clock....) and the full name of the signal was Fluorescent Unit ClocK, and everywhere that wire went on the schematic had that abbreviation on it... this is what happens when you translate stuff into a language you don't know very well...
 

DerStrom8

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that one wasn't hard to figure out.... my most recent favorite was a Samsung Blu-Ray player service manual. the fluorescent display had the initials for "Fluorescent Unit", and the serial clock that went to it (yes, they did, they used the standard "CK" abbreviation for clock....) and the full name of the signal was Fluorescent Unit ClocK, and everywhere that wire went on the schematic had that abbreviation on it... this is what happens when you translate stuff into a language you don't know very well...
Ouch, that's painful. Worst I see at work is "ASSY" short for "Assembly", but that's not really even worth mentioning.
At the very least I would've put an underscore between the first two letters and last two letters of the Fluorescent Unit ClocK abbreviation....
 

unclejed613

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At the very least I would've put an underscore between the first two letters and last two letters of the Fluorescent Unit ClocK abbreviation....
on that schematic all the signals had signal names of 4 characters or less. that was one of the last service manuals Samsung released with detailed schematics. after that it was block diagrams with the part numbers for the boards. then they switched to powerpoint slide decks with lists of the part numbers of the boards, and flow charts for troubleshooting. when i was in a class for a factory warranty repair cert from Denon, the instructor told us that the engineer that puts the service manuals together uses one of those old Franklin pocket translators for japanese to english. needless to say there are often some phrases that don't make a lot of sense in english in Denon service manuals.
 

Nigel Goodwin

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on that schematic all the signals had signal names of 4 characters or less. that was one of the last service manuals Samsung released with detailed schematics. after that it was block diagrams with the part numbers for the boards. then they switched to powerpoint slide decks with lists of the part numbers of the boards, and flow charts for troubleshooting. when i was in a class for a factory warranty repair cert from Denon, the instructor told us that the engineer that puts the service manuals together uses one of those old Franklin pocket translators for japanese to english. needless to say there are often some phrases that don't make a lot of sense in english in Denon service manuals.
I've always wondered why they never bother getting someone English and Technical, to correct the manual before actually printing it? - not just Denon, but ALL Japanese manufacturers.

My daughter works at a University in the Netherlands (as a post doc researcher), and a while back she was approached by a professor from a completely different department. Now everyone at Dutch Universities speaks English (in fact I'm not sure they don't actually do the lectures in English?), but the Professor asked Melissa if it was true she's English?, and if she could edit and correct some English documentation they were about to release - she did so, and basically it just needed very minor tweaks, and the odd 'stupid' bit altering. It helps that Melissa is actually good at English as well, even though she's a Chemist. I'm not sure what department it was for?, but Melissa is pretty good at most things, and could have done a degree in almost anything, so she was probably 'technical' enough to make sure it made sense.

Now that's what Denon and others should be doing!.

I don't know if anyone has ever used google translate from Dutch to English? (apart from me!), but either it's crap, or Dutch doesn't translate very well :D

I suspect much the same would apply to Japanese?.
 

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