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First time soldering

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Looks OK for a first attempt.

Critical comments:
Three of the joints may have a little bit more than the ideal amount of solder. It is difficult to tell from directly above.
Try not to scratch the solder resist (the green covering over the copper tracks) it looks untidy, but does not affect circuit operation.

JimB
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You forgot to tell us the important make and model of your soldering iron and solder.
Most noobs use a very cheap soldering iron that has no control of its temperature. Usually it is way too hot and incinerates the flux in the solder.
Some noobs use plumber's solder instead of electronics solder.
The solder should have a rosin core and tin/lead 63/37 works better than tin/lead 60/40.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
They look a little grey which could indicate a dry joint. A picture from the side would be more useful.

Mike.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The joints don't look bad.

Comments:
1. Use the soldering tip to push the lead of the component and to heat the pad. Apply solder to the pad and opposite sde of the soldering tip. <Solder><lead><Iron>
<Pad..........<Lead><iron>
........................<lead>

In other words do not apply solder to the tip of the soldering iron except to tin it.

2. Clean the flux off promptly.
 

Tmcca

New Member
This is a diy kit to practice soldering. I will get another pic. Maybe I should get a holder as well to make it easier to solder.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The very cheap soldering iron probably uses a simple light dimmer circuit to adjust its average power, not its temperature, especially since they say not to leave it idling. My name-brand soldering iron is always at the correct temperature.
They do not know much about it so they say it can be used for "welding"!:confused:
 

narkeleptk

Active Member
If your in the US xtronic makes some great irons fairly cheap. https://www.xtronicusa.com/

I have a 9020, 6040 and 4040 of theirs. The 9020 is pretty old now and still used quite a bit. You'd probably be most interested in something like their 9070.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My Weller soldering iron is about 50 years old and still works perfectly. I think they still make it.
Over those years I would have spent more money buying many cheap ones, and having misery every time one wore out.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Tmcca, being a new guy here on ETO, what you do not realise is that AudioGurus soldering iron is the same one that he used when he installed the sound system on Noahs Ark.

JimB
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Tmcca, being a new guy here on ETO, what you do not realise is that AudioGurus soldering iron is the same one that he used when he installed the sound system on Noahs Ark.

JimB
Bieng new to the forum, he probably thinks you're joking.
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Tmcca, being a new guy here on ETO, what you do not realise is that AudioGurus soldering iron is the same one that he used when he installed the sound system on Noahs Ark.

JimB
As far as AG can remember, it's the same one he used on the ark.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Here in Canada, everybody does not have a gun. But when I was about 12 years old I had a soldering gun that quickly turned the rosin in solder into smoke.
I never learnt how to drip solder onto a connection like many noobs do.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Here in Canada, everybody does not have a gun. But when I was about 12 years old I had a soldering gun that quickly turned the rosin in solder into smoke.
I never learnt how to drip solder onto a connection like many noobs do.
Yeah! And a Weller dual heat 100/140 W, I belive at that for me. i still have it, but don;t use it any more. I'll use a butane soldering iron for those jobs that used to require the Weller, otherwise a temperature controlled iron.

I caught someone doing drip soldering with brass etched pieces to build railroad cars for his business. I quickly turned him on to "resistance soldering" and that was all it took to get good joints every time.

Cesistance soldering is the perfect technology to solder connector terminals.
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
BTW does anyone know solder iron which is off when is not used, and which fast heat up when you take it to hand?
Like current transformer solder gun? thanks
 

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