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Electronic version of the German Enigma machine

Slawek_ps

New Member
Hello to all forum Users

this project was created in homage to Polish mathematicians (Rejewski, Rozycki, Zygalski) who broke the code of the German Enigma machine. In July 1939, the Polish side invited representatives of the cryptological services of France and Great Britain transferred all knowledge about decrypting the Enigma code. Based on the information provided by the Polish side created by the British in 1939, Bletchley Park, enabled Alan Turing to "quickly enter" further work on decoding the Enigma cipher.

In the documentation for the self-made electronic Enigma, there are all pcb prints for thermal transfer.


2019-09-18-enigma.jpg

Video electronic Enigma

Best regards,
Slawek
 

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dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Well done, the woodwork looks nice too, so you used a microcontroller to do the trick.
Station X played an important role during ww2.
Didnt the navy also use a 5 rotor version?
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
One of the many that worked at Bletchley Park and often overlooked is Gordon Welchman is credited with innovating the approach.
that led to data analysis techniques that today we describe as "metadata" analysis.
Some have credited his work with shortening WW11 by 2 or 3 years.
His method is still in use and was included in the US search and discovery of Osama bin Laden.
Max.
 

Slawek_ps

New Member
Well done, the woodwork looks nice too, so you used a microcontroller to do the trick.
Station X played an important role during ww2.
Didnt the navy also use a 5 rotor version?
Thank you, M4 Kriegsmarine had eight rotors and two additional Beta and Gamma additionally there were two types of reflectors, but at the same time four rotors and one reflector could be used
 

Slawek_ps

New Member
One of the many that worked at Bletchley Park and often overlooked is Gordon Welchman is credited with innovating the approach.
that led to data analysis techniques that today we describe as "metadata" analysis.
Some have credited his work with shortening WW11 by 2 or 3 years.
His method is still in use and was included in the US search and discovery of Osama bin Laden.
Max.
I recommend reading the book "XYZ" by Sir Dermot Turing (nephew of Alan Turing), the book presents evidence, witnesses that Sir Dermot Turing reached and presented the true story of "cracking the Enigma code"

Best regards,
Slawek
 

Slawek_ps

New Member
My point was there were other master minds that have rarely been heard of from Bletchley Park, fortunately BBC2 broadcast a documentary on Gordon Welchman.


Incidentally I grew up not far from Bletchley during that time.
Max.
I do not deny the achievements of cryptologists from Bletchley Park, I just want to pay attention to the omission of Polish mathematicians, French Intelligence as the first who broke the Enigma code and passed this knowledge to the English services. Until July 25, 1939, the French and English considered Enigma ciphers unbreakable, Polish mathematicians broke the enigma code in December 1932 ...

Please note whether on the Bletchley Park website you will find any information about the contribution of Poland and France in breaking the Enigma?

Best regards,
Slawek
 

BobW

Active Member
Some of the more recent books do give credit to the Polish mathematicians. I think the problem was that immediately after the war, Poland became a Warsaw pact country, and naturally, no one in the West wanted to give any credit to any country in the East. That prevented proper credit from being given for several decades. Now that relations have improved, proper credit is being given, but maybe not as quickly as it should.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My point was there were other master minds that have rarely been heard of from Bletchley Park, fortunately BBC2 broadcast a documentary on Gordon Welchman.
Managed to find a copy of that documentary and highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in this achievement. Thank you Max.

Mike.
 

BobW

Active Member
For readers of fiction, a couple of books I'd highly recommend, if you haven't already read them:
Enigma by Robert Harris
Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
Although they're fiction, they're very well researched.
 

Slawek_ps

New Member
Some of the more recent books do give credit to the Polish mathematicians. I think the problem was that immediately after the war, Poland became a Warsaw pact country, and naturally, no one in the West wanted to give any credit to any country in the East. That prevented proper credit from being given for several decades. Now that relations have improved, proper credit is being given, but maybe not as quickly as it should.
You are absolutely right, it does not change the fact that British behavior is not fair, look at the American Nation, attribute to others creating a thermonuclear bomb ? the creators are Hungarian Edward Teller and a Pole Stanislaw Ulam, it is fair.
Best regards
 

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