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Electric field between two point contacts on a large sheet

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jasonbe

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I've heard the equation described as polar, but does anyone know of any specific formulas describing E, the electric field? Are they different for different sheets? I've also heard that they would be independent of resistivity - at least on the scale that I'm interested in. Is there only one general equation for all sheets - or is it dependent on the material of the sheet? If so, is there an equation that includes the properties of the sheet - and not the actual type of material? Does the equation only involve the length and width of the sheet? At what depth does the depth of the sheet make a significant difference?

I've made some posts about different causes of resistance in sheets - and different causes of resistance in the specific type of sheet mentioned in this post - between two point electric contacts. Maybe I should clarify that the sheet could be as large as two feet by two feet - and is therefore much larger than any sheets that might be found in resistors - if this makes a difference. Some people have mentioned some equations, but I'd like to know of a formula for E that actually represents the shape of the field.
 
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3iMaJ

New Member
While I don't know the answer with out thinking about it further I can tell you how to start. First you're going to have to describe the current distribution on the sheet in some manner. Now given the current distribution you can calculate the electric vector potentional at some position in space and then finally you'll be able to calculate the electric field at some arbitrary position in space.

This is all of course predicated on the assumption that you CAN find a closed form solution for the current distribution on the "sheet." Finding current distributions of anything even the simplest geometries is sometimes a challenging task.
 

jasonbe

New Member
While I don't know the answer with out thinking about it further I can tell you how to start. First you're going to have to describe the current distribution on the sheet in some manner. Now given the current distribution you can calculate the electric vector potentional at some position in space and then finally you'll be able to calculate the electric field at some arbitrary position in space.

This is all of course predicated on the assumption that you CAN find a closed form solution for the current distribution on the "sheet." Finding current distributions of anything even the simplest geometries is sometimes a challenging task.
I've heard that it would be independent of resistivity. What is your guess as to whether the field would be the same for sheets having the same shape but different compositions?
 

jasonbe

New Member
Does anyone know if a there is a general formula for E - the electric field? Specifically, between point electric contacts on an infinitesimally thin sheet or a thicker sheet? Again, the sheet that I am trying to describe is really large - two feet by two feet perhaps.
 
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