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EasyEDA vs Kicad - looking for personal experiences

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Once I complete my current project I will probably start using whether Kicad or EasyEDA. While I've been user of Eagle for a long time, it seems it is time to move on. My intention is to get my PCB's eventually produced locally.

Could anyone, with experience in both applications, post some comments on his own experience? My goal is to compare them.

Links to the Web, please don't. I've been reading a lot already.

Thanks for any reply.
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
I too am/was a long-time user of Eagle.

I looked at Kicad some time back and found it too confusing to use. As someone who mastered (to some extent) Eagle, that's saying a lot.

A few months ago....well, probably a year ago now...., I tried EasyEDA and I'm hooked. There are some minor things I initially missed from Eagle, but that didn't last long. EasyEDA is in fact easy to use; there's some learning curve but it's not steep. Like Eagle, there are a few quirks on how to do some things, but nothing a quick search didn't solve.

I'd say a primary point in EasyEDA's favor is the huge component library. Most parts LCSC (Chinese equivalent of Digikey) are in the library, as are most parts from the Western World. In addition to the included libraries, the user-contributed library is immense. If a certain part isn't in the libraries, it can often be added using the library managers provided by Digikey and Mouser.

A final compelling reason to use EasyEDA is JLC's approximately free SMT assembly service. For "basic" parts in their library, they will assemble SMT components on the board for $7(lot of 10 boards) plus the cost of the components. For "extended" parts in their library – less commonly used and not always loaded on the pick&place machines – there's a $3 charge that covers loading the reel onto the p&p machine. This makes using some of the impossibly small parts practical.
 

Inquisitive

Super Moderator
My experience with Eagle was not the best. I found it backwards to my normal CAD experience.

However, I find Kicad to be very positive. No pun intended. I have done several pcb's with it and have no complaints.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I concur with everything Visitor says. Have had two lots of boards assembled and the quality is superb. The boards were 45x25mm and 20 assembled boards cost US$63 - $3.15 each. Due to the fact they are assembled I can use 0402 resistors, 0603 LEDs, SSOP chips etc. With components this small, you can fit a lot in 45x25 but size isn't an issue either. Only (slight) problem is you have to populate and through hole components yourself.

This is one of the boards as received - before adding through hole component - $3.15 each.:eek:
pcb.png
The dearest bit was the pic chip (16F18854). Try it and I don't think you'll look back.

Mike.
Edit, mysteriously, the boards had two extra holes not in the original (top-left and bottom-right - not plated). Anyone else had this or know why they're there?
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Anyone else had this or know why they're there?
Many years ago when submitting taped artwork, it came back with two drilled holes. They are basically alignment points.
Exactly how they are used, I don;t know.

I created 4 holes when I was exposing my own double sided boards to line up both sides of the exposure. I used tacks.
It wasn't precision, but close enough to work.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Those are probably tooling holes to correctly position the board during pick&place.
I assumed this was the most likely use but thought I'd ask anyway. Good job there weren't any tracks in that vicinity.
I created 4 holes when I was exposing my own double sided boards to line up both sides of the exposure.
I did that myself - from memory, around 25 (or more) years ago. At $3.15 per board populated, it's just not worth it anymore.

Mike.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I did a bunch of boards in our photo-lithography lab using a free DOS program called Easytrax. I made the sensitized boards using a spin coater and an oven. Exposure was using a 4"x4" mask aligner. Biggest problem was that I was severely limited in size. I remember doing multiple exposures, but I may have used a pre-sensitized board for that one. I had to modify the postscript printer code to get a ground plane.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
I also vouch for immense component library.

Like to use IV-25 Russian VFD tube?
Components cannot become more obscure than these.

Yet there was already a component in the EasyEda’s library
 

ACharnley

Member
Kicad is outstanding. I'd go so far as to say it's in my top 5 of all time Linux software. It really is an exception piece of engineering and worth the time investment. Id' not look at EasyEDA because it's proprietary, that simple.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I would just like to echo ACharnley in my experience so far.
And I came up on the very $expensive$ OrCad.
Between the KiCad Forum instant assistance and several tutorials it is worth it IMO
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Kicad is outstanding. I'd go so far as to say it's in my top 5 of all time Linux software. It really is an exception piece of engineering and worth the time investment. Id' not look at EasyEDA because it's proprietary, that simple.
It's proprietary yes. However, it doesn't hold you hostage to one vendor; Gerbers in standard format that can be used by any fab house are one click away.
 

billybob

Active Member
I too am/was a long-time user of Eagle.

I looked at Kicad some time back and found it too confusing to use. As someone who mastered (to some extent) Eagle, that's saying a lot.

A few months ago....well, probably a year ago now...., I tried EasyEDA and I'm hooked. There are some minor things I initially missed from Eagle, but that didn't last long. EasyEDA is in fact easy to use; there's some learning curve but it's not steep. Like Eagle, there are a few quirks on how to do some things, but nothing a quick search didn't solve.

I'd say a primary point in EasyEDA's favor is the huge component library. Most parts LCSC (Chinese equivalent of Digikey) are in the library, as are most parts from the Western World. In addition to the included libraries, the user-contributed library is immense. If a certain part isn't in the libraries, it can often be added using the library managers provided by Digikey and Mouser.

A final compelling reason to use EasyEDA is JLC's approximately free SMT assembly service. For "basic" parts in their library, they will assemble SMT components on the board for $7(lot of 10 boards) plus the cost of the components. For "extended" parts in their library – less commonly used and not always loaded on the pick&place machines – there's a $3 charge that covers loading the reel onto the p&p machine. This makes using some of the impossibly small parts practical.
I agree, although I'm not a long time user, EasyEDA is working well for me.
 

Lo_volt

New Member
My employer sent me for training on Pads early in my career so I have more than 15 years and many PC boards experience with it. My current employer bought Orcad/Allegro without asking the engineers. Everyone I talked to, regardless of what they were used to working with, thought it was garbage. Plenty of features, but outdated shortcut keys, obscure procedures for what should be simple tasks and worse. I tried Eagle when it was free, but never produced a board with it. Now that it's pay to play, I'll not bother.

With that background, I installed KiCad, created a simple schematic and was laying out a board within a matter of hours. It is that simple. It is limited on layer count and possibly some other minor issues, but overall easy to pick up and run with.

I have not tried EasyEDA.
 

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