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Don't care

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Mike - K8LH

Well-Known Member
Yep, I remember reading that long ago (grin).

You'll get the same results with pre:1 and post:16 Mike.

BTW, like Nigel, I prefer using the "set and forget" TMR2 for periodic interrupts (1.0-msec for me) for many simple standard tasks in an ISR (switch debounce, beep, RTC, timer functions, etc.)
 
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eng1

New Member
Mike said:
I prefer using the "set and forget" TMR2 for periodic interrupts (1.0-msec for me) for many simple standard tasks in an ISR (switch debounce, beep, RTC, timer functions, etc.)

How does this work exactly? (shell we start a new thread?)
 

Mike - K8LH

Well-Known Member
You simply setup the Timer 2 control registers, PR2 register, and interrupt registers in the initialization section of your code. Then process the periodic interrupts in your ISR.

Sorry if I may have caused you any confusion...
 

eng1

New Member
Mike said:
You simply setup the Timer 2 control registers, PR2 register, and interrupt registers in the initialization section of your code. Then process the periodic interrupts in your ISR.

That's what I usually do :) Thanks.


I will ask an opinion on TMR2 operation later :)
 
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Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Should you want slower interrupts then look at the "special event trigger" of the PWM module. This provides for a 16 bit period using Timer1. Again it is a set and forget timer. This is the timer I normally use for precision timing operations. Embarrassingly, you load it with N-1 as it too resets on the next increment.

Mike.
 

bananasiong

New Member
I thought:
Code:
	org	0x0000
	goto	Initialize

	org	0x0004
Interrupt
	movwf   w_temp
	swapf   STATUS,   w
	clrf	STATUS
	movwf   s_temp
	movf	PCLATH,   w
	movwf   p_temp
	clrf	PCLATH

	btfss   PIR1,TMR2IF
	goto	Int_Re

	bcf	PIR1,TMR2IF
;.
;.
;.
;.
;.
;.
;.
Int_Re
	movf	p_temp,   w
	movwf   PCLATH
	swapf   s_temp,   w
	movwf   STATUS
	swapf   w_temp,   f
	swapf   w_temp,   w
	retfie

Initialize
;.
;.
;.
	bcf	STATUS,   RP0
	movlw	b'00011101'               ;Prescale*postscale=16
	movwf   T2CON
	bsf	STATUS,   RP0
	movlw   d'245'
	movwf	PR2

	bsf	PIE1,   TMR2IE
	bcf	STATUS,   RP0
	bsf	INTCON,   PEIE
	bsf	INTCON,   GIE
;.
;.
;.
Main
;.
;.

I thought everything happens in the interrupt vector (from label Interrupt to Initialize) need to be considered? Because they happen around every 4ms, and take around 17 us to execute?
I have tried with PR2 set to 249, prescaler 4 and postscaler 4, in the interrupt vector, I increment 1 to a defined constant every time interrupt occurs, up to 250 times as 1 second. Then I tested my counter for 7 hours count down. When the counter count to 0, my stop watch showed 7 hours and 7 second. It means it delay for 1 second for every hour.
So I did calculation below:

[(1 us x Prescaler x Postscaler x PR2) + z] x 250 x 3600 = 3601 seconds
where z is the time taken for the instruction in the interrupt vector to be executed and 3600 is 1 hour. So:
[(1us x 4 x 4 x 249) + z] x 250 x 3600 = 3601
then I know my z is fixed (approximately 17 us) and I have to change PR2 and the '250' to get the nearest.

Am I doing wrongly?

Thanks
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I just compiled your code in MPLAB and made a few changes - set PR2 to 249 and added a counter set to 250. Setting a breakpoint in the counter reload code gave me exactly 1 second intervals. Try it in the simulator with the stopwatch.

Here's the code,
Code:
	include	"P16F628.inc"

	cblock	0x20
Count

w_temp
s_temp
p_temp

	endc



	org	0x0000
	goto	Initialize

	org	0x0004
Interrupt
	movwf   w_temp
	swapf   STATUS,   w
	clrf	STATUS
	movwf   s_temp
	movf	PCLATH,   w
	movwf   p_temp
	clrf	PCLATH

	btfss   PIR1,TMR2IF
	goto	Int_Re

	bcf	PIR1,TMR2IF

	decfsz	Count,F
	goto	Int_Re
	movlw	d'250'
	movwf	Count;	set breakpoint here

;.
Int_Re
	movf	p_temp,   w
	movwf   PCLATH
	swapf   s_temp,   w
	movwf   STATUS
	swapf   w_temp,   f
	swapf   w_temp,   w
	retfie

Initialize
;.
	bcf	STATUS,   RP0
	movlw	b'00011101'               ;Prescale*postscale=16
	movwf   T2CON
	bsf	STATUS,   RP0
	movlw   d'249'
	movwf	PR2

	bsf	PIE1,   TMR2IE
	bcf	STATUS,   RP0
	bsf	INTCON,   PEIE
	bsf	INTCON,   GIE
;.
;.
;.
Main	goto	Main
;.
;.

	end

HTH

Mike.
 

bananasiong

New Member
Yes, I do something similar to this. But the time taken to execute the instructions in the interrupt vector don't need to be counted? In my case, I use the interrupt vector to do multiplexing for four 7-segment display, and do counting down. These codes are located just before setting the break point (after bcf PIR1,TMR2IF)

Thanks
 

bananasiong

New Member
I have tried with PR2 set to 249, prescaler 4, postscaler 4 and a counter 250, and tested for 7 hours. But it lag for 1 second for every hour. After changing PR2 to 245 and a counter to 254, it becomes more accurate. I've tested for 10 hours, it lag for 1.x second for every ten hour.
 
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