• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

discharging a capacitor HELP

Status
Not open for further replies.

istion

New Member
http://www.vrphotos.com/el/Elinchrom 1000 schematic.jpg


Im just a photographer here, but want to change the flash tube on my flash unit pictured above.

I was told that "To discharge the capacitors, the voltage is accesible on the two legs of the flash tube, use a resistance of appropriate power. "

"The voltage is: 600/610V at full power and 300/305V at low power."

My question is what exact steps and resistance should I use to discharge these capacitors. any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

istion
 

Optikon

New Member
istion said:
http://www.vrphotos.com/el/Elinchrom%201000%20schematic.jpg


Im just a photographer here, but want to change the flash tube on my flash unit pictured above.

I was told that "To discharge the capacitors, the voltage is accesible on the two legs of the flash tube, use a resistance of appropriate power. "

"The voltage is: 600/610V at full power and 300/305V at low power."

My question is what exact steps and resistance should I use to discharge these capacitors. any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

istion
Assuming the unit is not powered..
I think you could use a series string of about 8, 10k carbon composition
resistors. You could get the 1/2W or 1/4 watt ones at radio shack. While they will have these power ratings exceeded, it wont be for very long while the capacitor discharges. So they might get warm when it is done but it wont hurt them. Take 8 of them and solder them together end by end and take the the two ends of the string and place them across the capacitor(one end on one capacitor lead and the other end on the other lead) this will cause stored charge in the capacitor to flow through the 80k ohms thus discharging it. The time it will take to discharge will be about 5*80000*C in seconds. Since the value of the capacitor is very small, this time will be very quick (just briefly touch both ends)...
 

MrMikey83

New Member
Might want to mention that some of these capacitor hold large charges and can shock you. Use insulated pliers or gloves to hold the resistors.

Also, if you have a multimeter, set it to read voltage and hold it to the capacitor leads. The meter will discharge the cap and with the insulated probes, you will be free of any shock.
~Mike
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top