Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

diagram to breadboard

Status
Not open for further replies.

ghostman11

Well-Known Member
i am new to electronics and very keen to learn, i have been unable to find very much on how you go from a circuit diagram to decideing where to put the components and breaks etc on a breadboard, any help would be greatly appreciated.
Actualy i think i mean stripboard!!! sorry for the confusion
 
Last edited:

Electronworks

New Member
When i started (back in the days when the earth was still cooling) I was told to layout the breadboard accroding to the circuit diagram (components on the left of the cct dig, put on the left of the breadboard etc).

Obviously you want your inputs and outputs close to the edge of the board (for ease of access) and as long as you are not doing anything high frequency, it should not matter about track length.

Where you cut the tracks should be obvious
 

ghostman11

Well-Known Member
thanks for that, i guess its a case of trial and error :D i to remember the days when the earth was cooling! looks like weve come full circle now ;)
 

ghostman11

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the replys, incase there are any other noobs like me out there i managed to find a realy helpful walkthru of laying out boards.

Stripboard

hope this is of help to someone else
 

indulis

New Member
It depends on what your building. For example, hi impedance inputs (like an opamp) should have a small loop area, especially if there is anything else in the circuit that can generate a field. The larger the loop area, the more susceptible it is to pick-up. For signals that carry “higher” current, the rule-of-thumb is “short and fat”. If the circuit is mixed-signal, you might consider separating the analog and digital sections
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top