• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

datasheets and part numbers of electronic components

Status
Not open for further replies.

PG1995

Active Member
Hi

I was learning about the datasheets and part numbers of electronic components. An an example you can have a look on the datasheet of 1N4001-1N4007 (part numbers) diode here.

1: Is this possible that the datasheet of one manufacturer for, say, 1N4001 could differ from the other?

2: Do the diode families differ by their ampere rating? At least it looks like this from this table. The family 1N400x and the family 1N540x operate at 1A and 3A respectively; and the members of the same family operate at different voltages.

3: Could you please list some manufactures which are most popular for making electronic components? I believe Fairchild is one of them.

I'm very much grateful for your help and time.

Regards
PG
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A 1N540x rectifier diode is much bigger than a little 1N400x rectifier diode so it can dissipate more heat (more current and more power).
A 1Nxxx is registered and all manufacturers of it must have exactly the same spec's.
E-Bay sells fake and defective ones.

Texas Instruments recently bought National Semi and there is ON Semi (I can't remember their other new name, they were Motorola long ago).
Across the pond there was Philips who changed their name to NXP and there are the Italians called ST Micro.
I think the German Siemens and Telefunken are gone.
There are a few Japanese semiconductor manufacturers (with horrible Engrish on their datasheets) and there are MILLIONS of Chinese ones (most with only Chinese on their datasheets) and also some South Korean ones.
 

carbonzit

Active Member
3: Could you please list some manufactures which are most popular for making electronic components? I believe Fairchild is one of them.
Since you only mentioned diodes, I'll give you some mfgrs. that make those critters (yes, Fairchild is one of them):

  • ON Semiconductor
  • Vishay
  • International Rectifier
  • Diodes Inc.
  • Microsemi
  • Zetex
  • Rohm
  • Infineon
  • MCC (Micro Commercial Components)
  • NXP (ex-Philips as AG pointed out)

to name just a few. Look at a real electronics catalog for more (from Digi-Key, Mouser, Newark, Allied or some other large electronics distributor).
 
Last edited:

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
He doesn't say which planet (which country) he is on. Maybe he can't buy any of these parts that are common in our part of Earth.
 

carbonzit

Active Member
He doesn't say which planet (which country) he is on. Maybe he can't buy any of these parts that are common in our part of Earth.
I don't believe that. We don't know where the O.P. (which could be a he or a she as far as I'm concerned) is from, true, but those manufacturers sell all over the world. It's a global market, dontcha know. (Of course, Digi-Key or Mouser could mean nothing to them, but I'm sure they can get diodes made by Vishay wherever they are.)
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Many people from India, Bangladesh and South Africa cannot get parts that are common to us. They also cannot afford to pay a small amount for shipping. They buy their parts at a "market". We buy food at our market.
 

simonbramble

Active Member
1: Is this possible that the datasheet of one manufacturer for, say, 1N4001 could differ from the other?
It is perfectly possible that 2 parts with the same part number, but from different manufacturers could be different. Safe bet is to always read the datasheet. This catches buyers out all the time. The designer will specify, say, a Diodes Inc diode and the buyer will buy Fairchild because it is cheaper, leaving the designer wondering why his circuit is not performing the same. Always read the datasheet to be sure....
 

PG1995

Active Member
Thank you, all of you. I really appreciate your help with this stuff.

A 1Nxxx is registered and all manufacturers of it must have exactly the same spec's.
1: Someone has told me, like you guys, that it is quite possible that datasheets of two manufacturers for the same component be different but the most important parameters remain unchanged. Do you agree?

2: AudioGuru says that 1Nxxx is registered.... I don't get that "registered" part and why manufacturers have to go with the same specs. Could you please elaborate a bit?

Many thanks for your time and help.
 
Last edited:

carbonzit

Active Member
Don't know about "registered", but the idea is that certain very common parts, like a 1N400X diode, should be the same no matter who makes them.

It's actually news to me that two manufacturers may have different specs (as stated on their datasheets) for the same part. I'll have to compare some datasheets to check this.

It also depends on what the part is being used for. The operation of a power supply that uses silicon rectifier diodes, for instance, is not going to be affected much by parts with slightly different specs, assuming that no maximum ratings are exceeded. A MOSFET used at a critical place in a circuit, however, might be a different story, and different parts from different makers may give different results.
 

simonbramble

Active Member
I think to 'assume' as always is a bad idea. Look at the 2 following datasheets:

http://www.analog.com/static/imported-files/data_sheets/REF02.pdf

http://focus.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ref02.pdf

These are both REF02A references, but the drift characteristic is different enough to upset some designs

Interesting, because I answered exactly the same as carbonzit on a forum some years ago (2 transistors from different manufacturers should be the same) and got blasted for it.

Generally (and only generally) the key specs of 2 parts should be the same. However, some manufacturers offer improved second sources (but keep the part number the same). Transistors and diodes are usually OK, but the more complex the chip, the more there is a chance that the manufacturer's process variations will mean that not all of the specs tie up.

You could argue that the designer should design the circuit to be immune from such differences, but sometimes it is unavoidable and the buyer should be instructed to only buy from one manufacturer..
 

PG1995

Active Member
Hi, again, :)

Please help me with the queries below. And I would request you to keep you replies simple. Thank you.

1: I believe the most important common parameter in the 7400 series is that it uses TTL. Please correct me.

2: I was reading Wikipedia article about pinout which I couldn't understand. Could you please put in simple and short words?

3: The following is from a Wikipedia article. My question is about the red part. I don't know what temperature has to do with the designation "74". In my humble opinion it should simply identify that it belongs to 7400 series. But perhaps 7400 series in itself has something to do with the temperature.

The part numbers for 7400 series logic devices often use the following naming convention, though specifics vary between manufacturers.

First, although sometimes omitted, a two or three letter prefix which indicates the manufacturer of the device (e.g. SN for Texas Instruments, DM for National Semiconductor) although these codes are no longer closely associated with a single manufacturer, for example Fairchild Semiconductor manufactures parts with MM and DM prefixes, and none.

A two-figure secondary prefix, of which the two most common are "74", indicating a commercial temperature range device and "54", indicating an extended (military) temperature range

Up to four letters describing the logic subfamily, as listed above (e.g. "LS" or "HCT").

Two or more digits assigned for each device, e.g. 00 for a quad 2-input NAND gate. There are hundreds of different devices in each family. The allocation of device numbers (and, with a few exceptions, the pin-outs) of the original 7400 family was carried across to the later families, and new numbers allocated for new functions, plus some of the competing CD4000 numbers and pin-outs were included over time. There is no pattern to the allocation of these numbers. The function and pin-out of the chip is nearly always the same for the same device number regardless of subfamily manufacturer – exceptions are discussed below.

Additional suffix letters and numbers may be attached to indicate the package type, quality grade, or other information, but this varies widely by manufacturer.

For example SN74ALS245N means this is a device probably made by Texas Instruments (SN), it is a commercial temperature range TTL device (74), it is a member of the "advanced low-power Schottky" family (ALS), and it is a bi-directional eight-bit buffer (245) in a plastic through-hole DIP package (N).
4: I have seen some 7400 series ICs such as 74LS00 with 14 pins. Are the number of pins always "14". I don't think so.

5: I think 7400 series implements different kinds of technologies used to manufacture transistors used in the ICs such as bipolar, MOSFET, etc. I think the one I saw on the net used bipolar technology because it used the label "Vcc".

Thank you very much for helping me with the queries above.

Regards
PG
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
74xx logic ICs are old TTL. I used them about 36 years ago. 74LSxx are faster lower power TTL and I used them about 30 years ago.
74Cxx logic ICs are Cmos. They have a wide supply voltage and use a very low amount of power. CD4xxx are the same but with different numbers. I still use them today.
74HCxx logic ICs are high speed Cmos. I have used them for about 16 years and still use them.
They are all different.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
1: I believe the most important common parameter in the 7400 series is that it uses TTL. Please correct me.

2: I was reading Wikipedia article about pinout which I couldn't understand. Could you please put in simple and short words?

3: The following is from a Wikipedia article. My question is about the red part. I don't know what temperature has to do with the designation "74". In my humble opinion it should simply identify that it belongs to 7400 series. But perhaps 7400 series in itself has something to do with the temperature.

4: I have seen some 7400 series ICs such as 74LS00 with 14 pins. Are the number of pins always "14". I don't think so.

5: I think 7400 series implements different kinds of technologies used to manufacture transistors used in the ICs such as bipolar, MOSFET, etc. I think the one I saw on the net used bipolar technology because it used the label "Vcc".
1: Yes, standard 74XX series are TTL (No C, AC, HC, etc. in the number).

2: The pinout is simply the function of each pin on the chip.

3: The 7400 series operate over the commercial temperature (typically 0'C to +70'C). The 5400 series are the same functional devices but operate over the military temperature range (typically -55'C to +125'C).

4: Most devices are 14-pin but not all. There are some 16-pin and some with even a higher pin count.

5: That's generally true. Read this for more info.
 

PG1995

Active Member
Thank you very much, audioguru, Carl, KeepItSimpleStupid.

@Carl: Your post was very helpful.

@KeepItSimpleStupid: Is there any short version of your username?! :) I tried to make one myself (KISS), then I thought perhaps you could get offended by it. I have to turn on/off caps several times typing your username. Well, I'm not complaining! :)

Best wishes
PG
 

carbonzit

Active Member
I've called them KISS, and I've seen others do it to, and they didn't seem offended at all. Kinda comes naturally with the moniker.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top